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LNG Trucks Heading to Lafayette, LA Due to Shell Deal with Ryder

Shell Oil Co. has signed an agreement with Ryder System Inc. for 15 liquefied natural gas (LNG) heavy-duty vehicles supporting oil and gas logistics operations in Lafayette, La., and Houston.

The new 15 LNG-fueled vehicles will replace Ryder diesel-powered vehicles in Shell’s existing fleet and will be serviced out of Ryder’s Lafayette facility, which is being engineered to meet the unique compliance requirements for natural gas. As part of this initiative, Ryder has signed a five-year fuel agreement with Shell, which will provide LNG fuel for the dedicated natural gas fleet.

The Shell seaport and cross-state routes are applications ideally suited for natural gas vehicles. Ryder worked with Shell to develop a customized truck specification that was weight-sensitive to maximize freight revenue, while ensuring durability and operability in the field.

“We are excited to work with Ryder to transfer diesel vehicles to LNG. LNG can be a good choice for truck owners, and more are making the switch to LNG,” says Dan Flynn, Shell’s vice president of logistics. “It is great to see Ryder’s drive for Shell LNG, a clean-burning fuel that meets emissions regulations without the need for after-treatment systems used in diesel engines.”

Ryder has deployed compressed natural gas and LNG vehicles into the fleets of its customers in Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, New York, Texas, Utah, Wisconsin, and Quebec.

The natural gas vehicles are being made available through Ryder’s participation in the Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Grant Program, funded by the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan initiatives and administered by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

Article via NGT News

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LCF Member Making Headlines | ExxonMobil, REG Researching Biodiesel Made from Cellulosic Sugars

ExxonMobil has partnered with the Renewable Energy Group (REG) to study the production of biodiesel by fermenting renewable cellulosic sugars from sources such as agricultural waste.

The agreement is between ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co. and REG’s Life Sciences subsidiary.

REG has developed a patented technology that uses microbes to convert sugars to biodiesel in a one-step fermentation process similar to ethanol manufacturing. The partners’ research will focus on using sugars from non-food sources.

“The science is extremely complex, but we hope to identify new affordable and reliable supplies of energy for the world that do not have a major impact on food supplies,” says Vijay Swarup, vice president of research and development at ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co.

“We look forward to this collaboration with ExxonMobil to advance our proprietary cellulosic sugar fermentation technology and capitalize on the combined power of cellulosic sugars and microbial fermentation to revolutionize the production of ultra-low carbon, cleaner -burning advanced biofuels,” says Eric Bowen, REG vice president and head of REG Life Sciences.

Through the research, the two companies will be addressing the challenge of how to ferment real-world renewable cellulosic sugars, which contain multiple types of sugars, including glucose and xylose, but also impurities that can inhibit fermentation.

“Our first challenge is to determine technical feasibility and potential environmental benefits during the initial research,” continues Swarup. “If the results are positive, we can then take the next step and explore the potential to expand our efforts and explore scalability.”

Article via NGT News

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More Electric Cars than Ever on Greenest Vehicles List

More Electric Cars than Ever on Greenest Vehicles List

Electric Vehicles Nab 9 out of Top 12 Spots in ACEEE's Environmental Vehicle Rankings  

Washington, DC (January 27, 2016): Despite a tumultuous year for the automotive industry, manufacturers have continued to offer exciting technology options for a growing vehicle market. Today at greenercars.org, the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) released its 19th annual comprehensive environmental ratings for vehicles.

The following vehicles comprise the Greenest List for 2016:

Greenest

Score

1.Mercedes Smart Electric Drive Convertible/Coupe

63

2. Chevrolet Spark EV

63

3. Fiat 500E

62

4. Toyota Prius Eco

61

5. Volkswagen E-Golf

61

6. Nissan Leaf S / Leaf SV

61

7. Kia Soul Electric

59

8. Toyota Prius C

59

9. Toyota Prius

58

10. Ford Focus Electric

57

11. Chevrolet Volt

56

12. Volkswagen Jetta Hybrid

56

 

The Smart ForTwo Electric Drive tops the Greenest List for the third year in a row with an unprecedented Green Score of 63. Toyota's Prius line performs exceedingly well once again, with the new Prius Eco nabbing the 4th spot, while the Prius C and original Prius claim spots #8 and #9. For the first time ever, the Greenest list is completely populated by plug-in and hybrid vehicles; not a single vehicle with only an internal combustion engine appears. This is partly due to the disappearance from the American market of a few of the longstanding entries on the Greenest List, including the Honda Civic Natural Gas. However, the conventional Smart ForTwo and Chevrolet Spark hover just below the Volkswagen Jetta Hybrid.

"The 2016 scores are in, and plug-in electric vehicles are outpacing all other vehicle offerings in terms of environmental friendliness. Fortunately, the electricity sector is slated to become cleaner over the life of model year 2016 vehicles, thanks to the Clean Power Plan, and that has bumped up electric vehicles' green scores this year. Nevertheless, it's important to acknowledge that how green your electric vehicle truly is depends on the electricity it uses to charge," said ACEEE lead vehicle analyst Shruti Vaidyanathan.

The newest additions to the list are the Volkswagen eGolf and the Kia's Soul electric vehicle, which claim the #5 and #7 spots respectively. This year marks the first time a Kia vehicle has earned a top spot since 2009. The improved 2016 Chevrolet Volt also nabs a spot this year (#11) thanks to significant increases in fuel economy and its new streamlined vehicle design. Once again this year, a diverse array of manufacturers are represented among the top 12 vehicles, including two American manufacturers.

Modern clean diesels have repeatedly placed well in ACEEE's annual rankings, only a few places away from the "Greenest" list. However, following the EPA announcement that Volkswagen has cheated federal emissions standards since 2009 with the use of defeat devices,greenercars.org suspended its Green Scores for all affected VW, Audi, and Porsche diesel models.

Greenercars.org identifies practical options in each class among the top widely available, automatic transmission, petroleum-fueled models, since many of the vehicles on the Greenest list are not widely available. The Greener Choices list includes trucks and SUVs, such as the Chevrolet Trax and the GMC Canyon. The gasoline-powered Chevrolet Spark and Honda Fit top their respective car classes. As the list demonstrates, consumers can make greener choices whatever their vehicle needs may be. Domestic manufacturers claimed five of the 12 Greener Choices spots:

Greener Choices

Score

1.Toyota Prius Eco

61

2. Toyota Prius C

59

3. Mercedes Smart For Two Convertible/Coupe

55

4. Chevrolet Spark

54

5. Toyota Prius V

54

6. Honda Fit

53

7. Ford C-Max Hybrid

51

8. Subaru Crosstrek Hybrid

48

9. Chevrolet Trax

47

10. Ford Transit Connect Van

42

11. Land Rover Range Rover Evoque

42

12. Chevrolet/GMC Colorago/Canyon

40

 

Greenercars.org provides the facts necessary to examine the eco-performance of any 2016 model. The site assigns each vehicle a Green Score, a single measure that incorporates lifecycle greenhouse gas and criteria pollutant emissions. Updates to this year's methodology include new estimates of emissions from fuel sourcing, transportation, and distribution as well as Clean Power Plan adjustments to electricity emissions.

The Meanest List this year is comprised of one pickup, heavier medium-duty vehicles, and a handful of European sports cars that are the least friendly to the environment. Vehicles with very low sales units are omitted from this list, and this year Class 2b pickups weighing above 8,500 lbs. were not rated:

Meanest

Score

1.Mercedes G65 AMG

20

2. Chevrolet/GMC G2500 Express/Savana (Passenger) (MDPV)

22

3. Mercedes G63 AMG

22

4. Bentley Mulsanne

23

5. Mercedes G550

23

6. Toyota Sequoia FFV

25

7. Ford Transit T150 Wagon FFV

25

8. Mercedes GL63 AMG

25

9. Lexus LX 570

26

10. Bentley Continental GT Convertible/Flying Spur

26

11. Toyota Tundra

26

12. Mercedes GL550 4Matic

26

 

In addition to highlighting the year's GreenestMeanestGreener Choices, and best-in-class lists, the greenercars.org website features informative write-ups on model year 2016 highlights, a consumer primer on vehicles and the environment, and advice on how to buy green when shopping for a new car or truck.

Green Scores of the 1,000+ configurations of all model year 2016 vehicles are available for free in the greenercars.org interactive database, along with each configuration's fuel economy, health-related pollution impacts, and greenhouse gas emissions. Visitors to the database can also build custom lists for comparing vehicles.

For interview requests and replicable graphics of the Greenest, Greener Choices, and Meanest lists, media should contact Patrick Kiker at202.507.4043pkiker@aceee.org.

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CMAQ funds are available for West Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge, Iberville, Ascension, and Livingston Projects

Call for CMAQ Project Proposals

  • For all projects, a 20% local match is required
  • Send project ideas and proposals to Ravi Ponnapureddy by Mid-April
  • Proposals Due:  May 2, 2016
  • Questions? Call Ravi at 225-383-5203


On October 1st, the Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, strengthened the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for Ground-Level ozone to 70 parts per billion (ppb) from the previous 75 ppb.  In the EPA’s public release about the new standard, the EPA stated that the new national standard was imposed “to protect public health.”

Due to the new standard, the Baton Rouge area faces threat of being classified in nonattainment again.  In the past, the five-parish region struggled to meet the standard.  When classified in nonattainment, the region experienced emissions inspections imposed on vehicles and stricter rules for industrial development.

The Baton Rouge area could still be classified in attainment if the next air monitoring report shows lower levels of ozone pollution or smog.  To determine if a Metropolitan area is in attainment or not, the areas are graded through an average of three years’ worth of air monitoring information. 

With the new standard, the area now has Congestion, Mitigation, and Air Quality (CMAQ) funds available to fund transportation projects or programs that will contribute to attainment or maintenance of the NAAQS for ozone, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter. 

The funds are aimed to improving air quality and relieving congestion.  For the 5-parish Capital Region, the Capital Region Planning Commission is calling for CMAQ projects for years 2020-2024.  For all projects, a 20% local match is required. 

See the tables below for information on high and medium priority CMAQ projects. 

CRPC_Activity_Update_Page_14.jpg

CRPC_Activity_Update_Page_15.jpg 

CMAQ ineligibility includes: roads classified as Rural Minor Collector and Local are not eligible for federal funds, building new roads and widening existing roads are not eligible for CMAQ funds, and the Federal Highway Administration’s Program Guidance will help to identify both eligible and ineligible projects.

Again, CMAQ funds are only available to parishes in ozone nonattainment and maintenance parishes.

Based on the Department of Transportation Development (DOTD) the following 5 parishes are eligible for funds:

  • East Baton Rouge
  • West Baton Rouge
  • Iberville
  • Ascension
  • Livingston

 

Information for applications:

  • All applications must identify sponsorship by a government entity such as a city, parish, or state government organization that can provide non-federal matching funds. 

  • An emissions analysis showing reductions for NOx and VOC, and DOTD Stage 0 documents must be included with the submittal of proposed projects. 

  • Applications should include a clear project timeline for implementation.

  • Applications should include six hardcopies of the Stage 0 documents, air quality analysis, and the proposed projects.

  • Applications are due May 2, 2016.

How CRPC can help:
The Capital Region Planning Commission can perform an emissions analysis and prepare the air quality report for submittal with the application.  If assistance is needed, please contact Ravi Ponnapureddy at NPonnapureddy@crpcla.org  or (225) 383-5203 by mid-April (at least 3-4 weeks prior to the deadline). 

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Workplace Charging Accounts for About a Third of All Plug-in Vehicle Charging Sessions in the INL EV Project Study

ENERGY.GOV
Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy
Transportation Analysis Fact of the Week


Workplace Charging Accounts for About a Third of All Plug-in Vehicle Charging Sessions in the INL EV Project Study

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed a study for the Department of Energy called the EV Project. This project collected data in 22 regions across the country from more than 8,000 privately owned Nissan Leafs and Chevrolet Volts for a three-year period between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2013. The study revealed that nearly all-participant charging occurred at home or at work while other charging sites accounted for less than 5% of all charging sessions. Although the Nissan Leaf is an all-electric vehicle while the Chevrolet Volt is a plug-in hybrid, both models had similar charging patterns with more than half of all charging sessions at home and about a third of charging sessions at work.

Bar Chart displaying the Share of Electric Vehicle Charging by Charging Location for Vehicles in the EV Project

Click here to view the supporting data 

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DE-FOA-0001462 FY 2016 Vehicle Technologies Program Wide Funding Opportunity Announcement

WASHINGTON – U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz announced more than $58 million in funding for vehicle technology advancements and released a report highlighting the successes of DOE’s Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing (ATVM) loan program while touring the newest vehicle technologies at the Washington Auto Show today.

Summary

This FOA supports a broad portfolio of advanced highway transportation technologies that reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas emission, while meeting or exceeding vehicle performance and cost expectations. Projects will focus on reducing the cost and improving the performance of a mix of near-and-long-term vehicle technologies.

Activities will contribute to achieving the goals of the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge, with a focus on accelerating the development of advanced batteries, power electronics, and lightweight materials technologies, while also supporting technology development to reduce petroleum consumption through advancements in combustion engines, alternative fuels, and other enabling technologies. The FOA also supports Clean Cities initiatives to overcome market barriers.

  • Concept Paper Submission Deadline: 2/18/2016 8:00 PM ET
  • Full Application Submission Deadline: 3/28/2016 8:00 PM ET

Projects supported by this new funding opportunity announced today will develop battery materials, components, and models; advanced electric drive vehicle motors; improve lightweight materials; address grid modernization and showcase plug-in electric vehicles and infrastructure.

Applications will be accepted for the following Areas of Interest (AOI):

  1. EV Everywhere Plug-In Electric Vehicle Local Showcases
  2. Grid Modernization for Electric Vehicles
  3. Accelerated Development and Deployment of Low-Cost Automotive Mg Sheet Components
  4. Corrosion Protection and Dissimilar Material Joining for Next-Generation Lightweight Vehicles
  5. Advances for the Production of Low Cost Electric Drive Vehicle Motors
  6. Development of Advanced High-Voltage Electrolytes and Additives, Conformable and Self-healing Solid State Electrolytes, and Lithium Metal Protection
  7. Development of Advanced Battery Material Characterization Techniques
  8. Advanced Battery Materials Modeling Technology Development to Reduce Petroleum Consumption Through Fuel Efficiency Improvements and Alternative Fuel Utilization in Passenger and Commercial Vehicles
  9. Enabling Technologies for Engine and Powertrain Systems
  10. Alternative Fuel Vehicle Workplace Safety Programs

If you would like to partner with your Clean Cities Coalition for AOI 1, please contact Ann Shaneyfelt at ashaneyfelt@louisianacleanfuels.org.

DOE will fund cost-shared projects with private industry, national laboratories, and university teams. For more information and application requirements, please visit the EERE Exchange website or Grants.gov. The ATVM report is available at Energy.gov.

Join us for a Webinar on January 28, 2016

Title: DE-FOA-0001384 Fiscal Year 2016 Vehicle Technologies Program Wide Funding Opportunity Announcement Applicant Webinar

Date: January 28, 2016
Time: 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM EST

Please register for this webinar using the following link:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3302892619932711426

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Via Energy.gov
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PATH Act: Federal Tax Credits Extended

Many Alternative Fuel Tax Credits Extended Retroactively

On Friday, December 18th, President Obama signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016 (H.R. 2029). Division Q, the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act (PATH Act), retroactively extends many tax credits.

There are several PATH Act provisions with implications for Clean Cities portfolio items:

  • Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit. Section 182 extends the tax credit for alternative fuel infrastructure through December 31, 2016. Fueling equipment for natural gas, propane, liquefied hydrogen, electricity, E85, and biodiesel are eligible for a tax credit of 30%, up to $30,000. Residential fueling equipment may receive a tax credit up to $1,000.

  • Alternative Fuel Excise Tax CreditSection 192 extends the $0.50 per gallon tax credit for alternative fuels, including liquefied hydrogen, through December 31, 2016.

  • Alternative Fuel Mixture Excise Tax CreditSection 192 also extends the $0.50 per gallon tax credit for alternative fuel used to produce a mixture containing at least 0.1% gasoline, diesel, or kerosene through December 31, 2016. Alternative fuel blenders must be registered with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

  • Biodiesel Income Tax CreditSection 185 extends the biodiesel income tax credit through December 31, 2016. A taxpayer that delivers unblended biodiesel (B100) into the tank of a vehicle may be eligible for a $1.00 per gallon of biodiesel, agri-biodiesel, or renewable diesel tax credit.

  • Biodiesel Mixture Excise Tax Credit. Section 185 also extends the $0.50 per gallon tax credit for biodiesel, agri-biodiesel, or renewable diesel used to produce a mixture containing at least 0.1% gasoline, diesel, or kerosene through December 31, 2016. Alternative fuel blenders must be registered with the IRS.

  • Second Generation Producer Tax Credit. Section 184 extends the tax credit for second generation biofuel producers through December 31, 2016. Second generation biofuel producers registered with the IRS may be eligible for a $1.01 per gallon of biodiesel tax credit.

The changes outlined above are effective immediately. To view the full text of the PATH Act, visit https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BILLS-114hr2029enr/pdf/BILLS-114hr2029enr.pdf. See the Alternative Fuels Data Center Federal Laws and Incentives page for descriptions of each incentive.

As always, if you have questions about the PATH Act or other topics, please contact the Technical Response Service or Louisiana Clean Fuels Staff. 

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TRS Question of the Month: What types of incentives and laws did state legislators and others enact in 2015?

Question of the Month: What types of incentives and laws did state legislators and others enact in 2015?

Answer: State legislators, as well as governors and utilities, were busy in 2015 introducing and enacting new incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and other petroleum reduction strategies. Programs related to plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and natural gas vehicles (NGVs), along with the associated fueling infrastructure, were most common at the state level.        

State Incentives

The most common types of incentives established in 2015 were grants and rebates. States leading the way in these areas include Delaware, most notably for its Clean Transportation Program rebates for vehicles and infrastructure. On the other hand, the number of tax incentives introduced at the state level decreased. In fact, Georgia repealed its successful tax incentive program. Aside from political and budgetary drivers, the decrease in new tax incentives may be the result of a call from industry to enact programs that will allow fleets and consumers to see their savings more immediately (e.g., rebates, vouchers). This would take the place of waiting until tax season when the financial benefit may get lost in the other expenses and returns from the previous year.

Utility Incentives

Utilities also continue to innovate and establish incentives that go beyond the typical residential charging infrastructure rebate and electricity rate discount programs. For example, Alabama Power offers an incentive to dealerships for each new PEV sale or lease within its service territory. Public Service Electric & Gas in New Jersey provides free electric vehicle supply equipment to qualified companies in its service territory for the purpose of workplace charging.

Laws and Regulations

Registration and licensing was the most common law and regulation topic, in part due to several states introducing fees for PEV registration to account for lost revenue from fuel taxes. Several states also continued to build on a movement that began in 2014 and changes that took place at the federal level by enacting legislation to tax natural gas and other fuels on an energy (i.e., gasoline-gallon or diesel-gallon) equivalent basis. States also continued to set targets and requirements for their own fleets, many of which go above and beyond federal requirements for alternative fuel vehicle acquisition. For example, Colorado Executive Order 2015-013 established fleet purchase and pricing requirements that prioritize NGVs, annual fuel use reduction targets on a vehicle-specific basis, goals for inter-agency coordination on petroleum reduction strategies, and commitments to workplace charging.

For the most up-to-date information on incentives, laws, and regulations, the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) provides a searchable database of state and federal incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and vehicles, air quality, vehicle efficiency, and other transportation-related topics.  You can find information relevant to your state, and all others at http://www.afdc.energy.gov/laws.

For more information on the legislative trends discussed above, as well as a summary of utility incentives and initiatives, visit the AFDC Technology and Policy Bulletins page athttp://www.afdc.energy.gov/technology_bulletins.html.

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State Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Laws and Incentives: 2015 Year in Review

For the most up-to-date information, the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) provides a searchable database of state-specific local and federal incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and vehicles, air quality, vehicle efficiency, and other transportation-related topics. See the AFDC Maps & Data page for related historical trends.

In 2015, state legislators and governors enacted nearly two times more incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and other petroleum reduction strategies than they did in 2014. Nonetheless, incentives, laws, and regulations related to plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and natural gas vehicles (NGVs), and the associated fueling infrastructure, remained the most common at the state level. Figure 1 includes a breakdown of the actions states and utilities took by fuel or technology type.

 

Figure 1. Number of State-Level Laws, Regulations, and Incentives Established in 2015*

* Because an incentive, law, or regulation may apply to more than one technology type, some items were counted multiple times.

Figure 2 demonstrates year-to-year trends in state and utility incentives, as well as state laws and regulations. Except for a dip in 2014, which is possibly attributable to reduced state budgets and competing political priorities, the number of incentives for alternative fuels and advanced vehicles has increased steadily over the last four years. In contrast, the number of utility and private incentives during this time has decreased. An overall trend in laws and regulations are not as apparent, though year-to-year legislation in this area tends to follow market tendencies. For example, in recent years, the legislative focus has consistently been on NGVs and PEVs.

Figure 2. Number of State-Level Laws, Regulations, and Incentives Established In Recent Years
Figure 3. Number of 2015 State Established Incentives by Type*

* Because an incentive may apply to more than one category, some items were counted multiple times.

State Incentives

Figure 3. Number of 2015 State Established Incentives by Type*In 2015, state legislatures and agencies established 36 new incentives related to alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and fuel-efficient transportation. This is a marked increase from the number of incentives established in 2014, and the highest number in the last four years.

The most common types of incentives established in 2015 were grants and rebates, as shown in Figure 3. States leading the way in these areas includeDelaware, most notably for its Clean Transportation Program rebates for vehicles and infrastructure, as well as ColoradoMassachusettsMaryland,Nebraska, and New Hampshire. While the number of incentives for most categories or types increased from 2014 to 2015, the number of tax incentives decreased. Significantly, Georgia repealed its successful tax incentive program. Aside from political and budgetary drivers, the decrease in new tax incentives may be the result of a call from industry to enact programs that will allow fleets and consumers to see their savings more immediately (e.g., rebates, vouchers), rather than waiting until tax season when the financial benefit may get lost in the other expenses and returns from the previous year.

Utility Incentives

Six new utility-based incentives were identified in 2015, the lowest number in the last four years. Note that there were no new private entity facility incentives and all new incentives were related to PEVs. Utilities continue to innovate and establish incentives that go beyond the typical rebate and electricity rate discount programs. For instance, Alabama Power offers an incentive to dealerships for each new PEV sale or lease within its service territory. Public Service Electric & Gas in New Jersey provides free electric vehicle supply equipment to qualified companies in its service territory for the purpose of workplace charging.

Laws and Regulations

Figure 4. Number of State Established Laws and Regulations by Type*

* Because a law or regulation may apply to more than one category, some items were counted multiple times.

In 2015, states enacted 38 new laws and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles, as compared to 29 newly enacted laws and regulations in 2014. The most common topics for these laws and regulations can be seen in Figure 4. Figure 1 outlines the breakdown of this activity by fuel and technology type. A total of 11 laws and regulations are related to registration and licensing, many of which are fees for PEV registration to account for lost revenue from fuel taxes, including new fees in Georgia,IdahoMichigan, and Wyoming.

Several states also continued to build on a movement that began in 2014 and changes that took place at the federal level by enacting legislation to tax natural gas and other fuels on an energy (i.e., gasoline-gallon or diesel-gallon) equivalent basis. These states include IdahoMichiganOklahoma,TennesseeUtah, and Wyoming.

States also continued to set targets and requirements for their own fleets, many of which go above and beyond federal requirements for alternative fuel vehicle acquisition. For example, Colorado Executive Order 2015-013 established fleet purchase and pricing requirements that prioritize NGVs, annual fuel use reduction targets on a vehicle-specific basis, goals for inter-agency coordination on petroleum reduction strategies, and commitments to workplace charging.

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IRS Issues Guidance for Claiming the 2015 Alt. Fuel Credit

This morning, the IRS released updated guidance for claiming the alternative fuel tax credit for 2015. The credit was extended retroactively by the PATH Act that was signed into law in December. The IRS has not released guidance on the new excise tax rates or claiming the credit in 2016 just yet, but keep an eye out for the info!

Find the guidance document here: 2015 IRS Guidance

Guidance provided by: National Propane Gas Association

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