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LCF Wins Grant in Partnership with IdleAir to Install Diesel Emissions Reduction Equipment at Truck Stop in Port Allen

Baton Rouge, LA | June 19, 2013 — Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition (now LCF) received a grant from Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality for the installation of a truck stop electrification project at the Cash’s Truck Plaza in West Baton Rouge. $200,633.00 will match the project partner, IdleAir’s contribution of $207,451.00 for completion of the “Louisiana IdleAir Truck Stop Electrification Project”.

The grant will help in fulfilling the mission of Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition by supporting economic growth, improving local air quality, and reducing our nation’s dependence on imported petroleum. LCF executive director, Lauren L. Stuart explains “Our non-profit organization is excited to work with IdleAir and LDEQ on this public private partnership. The Cash’s Truck Plaza project will install 36 electrified truck parking spaces that will help truck drivers manage their fuel budgets by minimizing idling time. The project also creates commercial opportunities for the transportation industry in our area.”

IdleAir Advanced Truck Stop Electrification provides Class 8 long-haul truck drivers with a suite of services that eliminate the need for idling. “We are pleased to expand IdleAir’s growing national network, and at the same time, help Louisiana communities improve their air quality,” says Ethan Garber, IdleAir CEO. “IdleAir thanks the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality and the Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition for their help in making this progress possible.” Projected impact of the project include; reducing consumption of diesel by 105,120 gallons and reducing toxic emissions from on-road engines by an estimated 1,185 tons per year. IdleAir supports American energy independence by using homegrown electric power from domestic energy resources.

Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality provides this funding through the Clean Diesel Grant Program, as part of the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA). The LDEQ has allocated over 2.5 million dollars in DERA funding to seven diesel engine emission reduction projects. “From retrofitting the Caddo Public School Bus Diesel Fleet to reducing the idling of the New Orleans Public Belt Railroad locomotive diesel fleet, the DEQ is committed to improving the air quality for our citizens while investing in public and private partnerships that make good environmental and economic sense” says DEQ Assistant Secretary Sam Phillips. “In addition to significantly reducing toxic air emissions from diesel engines, these projects have created jobs and improved public and private diesel fleets in Caddo, Bossier, Baton Rouge, and Orleans Parishes by saving diesel fuel and increasing diesel engine efficiency. The DEQ looks forward to the completion of this project and will continue to seek ways to sponsor public and private partnerships to better the air quality in Louisiana.”

Clean Cities advances the nation’s environmental, economic and energy security by supporting local actions to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Clean Cities is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Program. Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition was established in 2000 and is a designated affiliate of the Department of Energy program in conjunction with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. We appreciate support provided by the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources and all of our generous stakeholders. Membership to LCF is available to the public at large.

Contacts:

Ann Shaneyfelt, Communications Coordinator / Greater Baton Rouge Clean Cities Coalition

225-334-8083

info@louisianacleanfuels.org

 

Jeff Maurer / IdleAir

865-232-1700

jeff.maurer@idleair.com

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Alternative Fuel Provider and State Fleet Mandates Under EPAct

This Question of the Month is the second installment in a two-part series. Last month, the Question of the Month described requirements for federal fleets. This month, we will focus on state and alternative fuel provider fleets.

Question: What are the requirements for state and alternative fuel provider fleets under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct 1992) and subsequent regulations and directives?

Answer:

EPAct 1992 mandates that certain state government and alternative fuel provider fleets in the United States acquire specified percentages of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) on an annual basis as they add light-duty vehicles (LDVs) to their fleets. Below we have described a number of means  beyond simply acquiring AFVs  by which these fleets may achieve compliance.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for overseeing compliance with these requirements, which were promulgated and published at 10 CFR Part 490 as the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program. Information about state and alternative fuel provider “covered fleets” (fleets subject to EPAct 1992 requirements) and the requirements associated with this compliance program are outlined below for each fleet type.

State Fleets

Covered Fleets

State government (including state agency and state university) fleets are considered covered fleets if all of the following conditions are met:

  • They own, operate, lease, or otherwise control 50 or more light-duty vehicles (LDVs; vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of 8,500 pounds or less) within the United States and are not on the list of excluded vehicles. Excluded vehicles include emergency, law enforcement, and non-road vehicles;
  • At least 20 of those vehicles are used primarily within a single metropolitan statistical area (MSA)/consolidated MSA (CMSA), based on 1980 census data. A list of covered MSA/CMSAs can be found online: https://www.afdc.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/epact/state/progs/dyn_msa.cgi; and
  • Those same 20 vehicles are centrally fueled or capable of being centrally fueled, meaning they are capable of being fueled at least 75% of the time at a location that is owned, operated, or controlled by the fleet or is under contract with that fleet for fueling purposes.

The following resources may be used to determine whether a state fleet is covered:

Requirement

Like federal fleets regulated under EPAct 1992, a covered state fleet must acquire in a model year the number of AFVs that is equal to at least 75% of the fleet’s non-excluded LDV acquisitions.

Compliance Methods

Covered state fleets may meet their requirements using multiple means through one of two compliance methods:

  • Standard Compliance: Fleets can acquire the requisite number of new or used AFVs, convert conventional vehicles to run on an alternative fuel within four months of acquisition, or obtain AFV credits from other covered fleets. Covered fleets earn one credit for each light-duty AFV that is acquired beyond the fleet’s annual requirement for the model year. Credits earned by going beyond compliance are banked for future use. Credits may also be traded with other fleets. Covered fleets may also meet up to 50% of their AFV-acquisition requirements by purchasingbiodiesel blends of at least B20 for use in medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. One credit toward compliance is earned for every 450 gallons of neat biodiesel (B100) or every 2,250 gallons of B20 purchased for use. Credits earned for biodiesel purchase for use may not be banked. In addition, a fleet may earn credits for its medium- and heavy-duty AFV acquisitions, but only after the fleet has met its light-duty AFV acquisition requirements.
  • Alternative Compliance: Covered fleets may obtain a waiver from the AFV acquisition requirements of Standard Compliance by submitting and then implementing a DOE- approved plan to reduce the fleet’s annual petroleum consumption. The plan must result in petroleum reductions equal to what the fleet would have achieved if all its AFVs were running on alternative fuel all the time. The plan must also include a sufficient level of data and information to support the fleet’s compliance requirements, particularly information on fuel use. Alternative Compliance petroleum reduction methods include, among others, hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) use, alternative fuel use, reduction in vehicle miles traveled, idle-time reduction, and truck stop electrification.

For a summary of compliance methods, visit the following website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/epact/compliance_methods.html.

Inclusion of Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Electric Vehicles 
Currently, all-electric vehicles (EVs) and some plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) qualify as AFVs under Standard Compliance. DOE published a notice of proposed rulemaking in October 2011, pursuant to Section 133 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, that would allocate AFV credits for covered fleet acquisitions of the following vehicles:

  • HEVs would receive one-half credit
  • PHEVs (those that do not already meet the definition of an AFV) would receive one-half credit
  • Fuel cell electric vehicles (those that do not already meet the definition of an AFV) would receive one-half credit
  • Neighborhood electric vehicles would receive one-fourth credit

For more information on this proposed rulemaking, please see the proposed rule fact sheet (http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/epact/pdfs/section_133_proposed_rule.pdf) and the full notice (http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-10-31/pdf/2011-26761.pdf).

Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets

Covered Fleets

A covered alternative fuel provider is any entity that meets one of the following conditions:

  • The entity’s principle business involves producing, storing, refining, processing, transporting, distributing, importing, or selling any alternative fuel (other than electricity);
  • The entity’s principle business involves generating, transmitting, importing, or selling electricity at wholesale or retail; or
  • The entity produces, imports, or produces and imports in combination, an average of 50,000 barrels per day or more of petroleum, and 30% or more of its gross annual revenues are derived from producing alternative fuels.

An alternative fuel provider is not covered if its principal business involves:

  • Transforming alternative fuels into products that are not alternative fuels; or
  • Using alternative fuel as a feedstock, or fuel, in the manufacturing of products that are not alternative fuels.

In addition to meeting this definition, alternative fuel provider fleets are also subject to the same conditions for inclusion as state fleets (see above). For example, if a fleet does not own, operate, lease, or otherwise control at least 50 non-excluded LDVs, then it is not considered a covered fleet.

The Decision Tree for Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets (http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/epact/alt_decision_tree.html) may be used to determine whether an alternative fuel provider fleet is covered.

Requirement

A covered alternative fuel provider fleet must acquire in a model year the number of AFVs that is equal to at least 90% of the fleet’s non-excluded LDV acquisitions.

Compliance Methods

Covered alternative fuel provider fleets have the same options for achieving compliance as state fleets.

*           *           *

Additional information on state and alternative fuel provider requirements and compliance options, as well the annual reporting requirements, may be found on DOE’s EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities website (http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/epact/index.html). In addition, the online Clean Cities University course on Understanding EPAct-Regulated Fleets (http://www1.eere.energy.gov/cleancities/toolbox/university.html) provides an overview of state and alternative fuel provider requirements.

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team

technicalresponse@icfi.com

800-254-6735

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Federal Fleet Requirements under EPAct of 1992

This Question of the Month is the first installment in a two-part series describing requirements for federal fleets (May) and state and alternative fuel provider fleets (June) under EPAct 1992 and subsequent regulations and directives.  

What are the requirements for federal fleets under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct 1992) and subsequent regulations and directives?

EPAct 1992, EPAct 2005, and National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) of 2008

Under EPAct 1992 , 75% of new covered light-duty vehicles (LDVs) acquired by federal fleets must be alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). Federal fleets are considered covered fleets if both of the following conditions are met:

  • They own, operate, lease, or otherwise control 20 or more non-excluded LDVs (vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of 8,500 pounds or less) that are used primarily within a single metropolitan statistical area. Excluded vehicles include emergency, law enforcement, military tactical, and non-road vehicles, and
  • Those same 20 vehicles are centrally fueled or capable of being centrally fueled.

NDAA of 2008 expanded EPAct 1992’s definition of AFVs to include hybrid electric vehicles, fuel cell vehicles, advanced lean burn technology vehicles, andany low-greenhouse gas (GHG) emitting vehicle (as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) acquired in a location that would qualify for an EPAct 2005, Section 701 fuel waiver. Section 701 of EPAct 2005 requires federal fleets to use alternative fuels in dual-fuel vehicles unless the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determines an agency qualifies for a waiver; grounds for a waiver include the lack of alternative fuel availability (within five miles or 15 minutes from the vehicle’s garaged location) and cost restrictions (alternative fuel is more expensive per gallon than gasoline). To find information about waivered fleets in your area, visit the Sustainable Federal Fleet Performance Data website.

Federal fleets comply with EPAct 1992 requirements using AFV acquisition credits, which are granted based on the number of AFVs acquired and the volume of biodiesel fuel used. If an agency’s total AFV credits divided by the number of covered LDV acquisitions in a fiscal year (FY) equals 75% or greater, the agency is considered to be in compliance. Federal fleets earn credits for each light-, medium-, or heavy-duty AFV they acquire each year and for every 450 gallons of pure biodiesel (B100), equivalent to 2,250 gallons of B20, used in fleet vehicles.

For more information on EPAct 1992, please refer to the Federal Energy Management Program’s (FEMP) EPAct 1992 website, as well as the full text ofEPAct 1992.

Executive Orders

Executive Order  (E.O.) 13423 requires federal agencies with 20 or more non-excluded vehicles in their U.S. fleet to decrease petroleum consumption by 2% each year, relative to their FY 2005 baseline, through the end of FY 2015, for a total reduction of 20%. Agencies must also continue to increase their alternative fuel use by 10% per year, relative to the previous year over the same time frame, yielding an approximately 159% increase.

E.O. 13514 requires each federal agency to develop, implement, and annually update a Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. Federal agencies must measure, reduce, and report their GHG emissions, with an overall federal government direct GHG emissions reduction goal of 28% by 2020, relative to a FY 2008 baseline. Reductions may be achieved through a variety of measures including reducing vehicle use, increasing fleet fuel efficiency, using AFVs, and implementing fleet optimization efforts.  In addition, E.O. 13514 extended petroleum reduction targets established by E.O. 13423 to FY 2020, for a total future reduction of 30%.

Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA)

Further requirements for federal fleets were included in the EISA 2007, including fleet management plan requirements (Section 142), low-GHG emitting vehicle acquisition requirements (Section 141), and renewable fuel infrastructure installation requirements (Section 246). DOE is currently developing a rulemaking on the alternative fuel increase requirements under EISA Section 142.

For a summary of federal agency fleet requirements, refer to the Sustainable Federal Fleets website and Alternative Fuels Data Center Vehicle Acquisition and Fuel Use Requirements for Federal Fleets summary. Also refer to the Clean Cities University course on Understanding EPAct-Regulated Fleets and the FEMP training course on Fleet Management 101.

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team

technicalresponse@icfi.com

800-254-6735

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