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Fact of the Week

According to the Fueleconomy.gov website, the list of the top ten most fuel efficient light vehicles includes nine electric vehicles (EV) and one plug-in hybrid-electric vehicle (PHEV). Electric vehicle fuel economy is measured in miles per gallon equivalent, or MPGe, where 33.7 kilowatt-hours of electricity is equal to one gallon of gasoline.

The Hyundai Ioniq Electric, with a combined city/highway fuel economy of 136 MPGe tops the list for model year (MY) 2017. Three vehicles tied for the fifth spot on the list – the Fiat 550e, the Mitsubishi i-MiEV, and the Nissan Leaf – with 112 MPGe. The BMW i3 REX, a range-extended electric vehicle, has a combined gasoline/electric city/highway fuel economy rating of 88 MPGe.

TOP TEN MOST FUEL EFFICIENT LIGHT VEHICLES, MY 2017

Vehicle PhotoVehicleCombined Fuel
Economy
(MPGe)
City/Hwy Fuel
Economy
(MPGe)
2017 Hyundai Ioniq Electric Hyundai Ioniq Electric
Automatic (A1) EV
136 150/122
2014 BMW i3 BMW i3 BEV (60 Amp-hour battery)
Automatic (A1) EV
124 137/111
2017 Chevy Bolt Chevrolet Bolt
Automatic (A1) EV
119 128/110
2014 BMW i3 BMW i3 BEV (94 Amp-hour battery)
Automatic (A1) EV
118 129/106
2017 Fiat 500e Fiat 500e
Automatic (A1) EV
112 121/103
2016 Mitsubishi iMiEV Mitsubishi i-MiEV
Automatic (A1) EV
112 121/102
2017 Nissan LEAF Nissan Leaf
Automatic (A1) EV
112 124/101
2016 Kia Soul EV Kia Soul Electric
Automatic (A1) EV
105 120/92
2014 BMW i3 BMW i3 REX (94 Amp-hour battery)
0.6 L, 2 cyl, Automatic (A1) PHEV
88 95/81
2017 Mercedes B250e Mercedes-Benz B250e
Automatic (A1) EV
84 85/82

Note: A1 = automatic transmission with one speed.
Source: U.S. Department of Energy, Fuel Economy data, Fueleconomy.gov Top Ten, accessed December 1, 2016.

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DOE Announces $15 Million to Accelerate the Deployment of Energy Efficient Transportation Technologies

DOE Announces $15 Million to Accelerate the Deployment of Energy Efficient Transportation Technologies

December 21, 2016 - 1:00pm - Today, the Energy Department (DOE) announced $15 million, subject to appropriations, to support community-based projects to accelerate the adoption of advanced and alternative fuel vehicles and demonstrate energy efficient mobility systems including connected and autonomous vehicles as well as new transportation system models. 

DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy seeks highly leveraged Alternative Fuel Vehicle Community Partner Projects that will significantly accelerate the use of light, medium, and heavy duty vehicles that operate on fuels such as biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane as well as the fueling infrastructure needed to support them. Led by community-based partnerships between state and local governments and key private sector stakeholders, these projects will help catalyze alternative fuel use nationwide through the collection and sharing of best practices and lessons learned.

In addition, DOE seeks highly innovative "living lab" demonstration projects that integrate smart mobility technologies in a holistic approach to the movement of people and/or goods that maximizes energy efficiency. 

Link to the FOA: 

 

Please join us for an Applicant webinar!

Date and Time
Jan 12, 2017 2:00 - 3:00 PM EST 

Audio
Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP).
United States: +1 (415) 930-5321 
Access Code: 349-408-461
Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar

 

Registration URL:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4091045651792332292 

 

For more information and application requirements, please visit the EERE Exchange website  or Grants.gov.  

The Department’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy accelerates development and deployment of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies and market-based solutions that strengthen U.S. energy security, economic vitality, and quality of life.

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Fact of the Week

The Environmental Protection Agency divides sport utility vehicles (SUV) into car SUV and truck SUV based on size and the number of drive wheels. Altogether, the two classes accounted for 34% of light vehicle production in model year (MY) 2016. In MY 1975, about 80% of the vehicles produced were cars. The share of cars (blue area) was generally shrinking until 2003 and since that time has been around 50% of light vehicle production.

LIGHT VEHICLE PRODUCTION SHARES BY VEHICLE CLASS, MY 1975-2016

Graph showing light vehicle production shares by vehicle class for model years 1975 through 2016.

Note: MY 2016 data are preliminary.
To see a list of vehicles in the car SUV category, see Table 4.9 in the Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 35.

Fact #956 Dataset

SUPPORTING INFORMATION

Light Vehicle Production Shares by Vehicle Class, MY 1975-2016

Model YearCarCar SUVTruck SUVPickupMinivan/Van
1975 80.6% 0.1% 1.7% 13.1% 4.5%
1976 78.8% 0.1% 1.9% 15.1% 4.1%
1977 80.0% 0.1% 1.9% 14.3% 3.6%
1978 77.3% 0.1% 2.5% 15.7% 4.3%
1979 77.8% 0.1% 2.8% 15.9% 3.5%
1980 83.5% 0.0% 1.6% 12.7% 2.1%
1981 82.7% 0.0% 1.3% 13.6% 2.3%
1982 80.3% 0.1% 1.5% 14.8% 3.2%
1983 77.7% 0.3% 2.5% 15.8% 3.7%
1984 76.1% 0.4% 4.1% 14.6% 4.8%
1985 74.6% 0.6% 4.5% 14.4% 5.9%
1986 71.7% 0.4% 4.6% 16.5% 6.8%
1987 72.2% 0.6% 5.2% 14.4% 7.5%
1988 70.2% 0.7% 5.6% 16.1% 7.4%
1989 69.3% 0.7% 5.7% 15.4% 8.8%
1990 69.8% 0.5% 5.1% 14.5% 10.0%
1991 67.8% 1.8% 6.9% 15.3% 8.2%
1992 66.6% 2.0% 6.2% 15.1% 10.0%
1993 64.0% 3.6% 6.3% 15.2% 10.9%
1994 59.6% 2.3% 9.1% 18.9% 10.0%
1995 62.0% 1.5% 10.5% 15.0% 11.0%
1996 60.0% 2.2% 12.2% 14.9% 10.7%
1997 57.6% 2.5% 14.5% 16.7% 8.8%
1998 55.1% 3.1% 14.7% 16.7% 10.3%
1999 55.1% 3.2% 15.4% 16.7% 9.6%
2000 55.1% 3.7% 15.2% 15.8% 10.2%
2001 53.9% 4.8% 17.3% 16.1% 7.9%
2002 51.5% 3.7% 22.3% 14.8% 7.7%
2003 50.2% 3.6% 22.6% 15.7% 7.8%
2004 48.0% 4.1% 25.9% 15.9% 6.1%
2005 50.5% 5.1% 20.6% 14.5% 9.3%
2006 52.9% 5.0% 19.9% 14.5% 7.7%
2007 52.9% 6.0% 21.7% 13.8% 5.5%
2008 52.7% 6.6% 22.1% 12.9% 5.7%
2009 60.5% 6.5% 18.4% 10.6% 4.0%
2010 54.5% 8.2% 20.7% 11.5% 5.0%
2011 47.8% 10.0% 25.5% 12.3% 4.3%
2012 55.0% 9.4% 20.6% 10.1% 4.9%
2013 54.1% 10.0% 21.8% 10.4% 3.8%
2014 49.2% 10.1% 23.9% 12.4% 4.3%
2015 47.2% 10.2% 28.1% 10.7% 3.9%
2016 51.4% 10.7% 23.4% 10.8% 3.6%

Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends Report: 1975 Through 2016 November 2016, EPA-420-R-16-010, Table 3.1.

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Fact of the week

The fuel economy of new light vehicles has generally risen since 2004 and reached an all-time high of 25.6 miles per gallon in model year (MY) 2016. The production-weighted average fuel economy of three of the vehicle classes – cars, car sport utility vehicles (SUVs), and truck SUVs – had never been higher than in MY 2016. For pickups and minivans, the MY 2016 average fuel economy reached the same level as a previous high. Car SUVs experienced a 131% improvement in fuel economy from MY 1975 to 2016 – the largest improvement of any vehicle class. Overall, pickups had the smallest fuel economy improvement of the vehicle classes (60%) likely due to changes in size and power of pickups sold over the time period shown.

NEW LIGHT VEHICLE FUEL ECONOMY BY VEHICLE CLASS, MY 1975-2016

Graph showing new light vehicle fuel economy by vehicle class for the model years 1975 through 2016.

Notes:

  • Model year 2016 data are preliminary.
  • To see a list of vehicles in the car SUV category, see Table 4.9 in the Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 35.
  • Average fuel economy is the production-weighted harmonic mean.

Fact #955 Dataset

SUPPORTING INFORMATION

New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy by Vehicle Class, MY 1975-2016

Model YearFuel Economy (Miles per Gallon)
CarCar SUVPickupTruck SUVMinivan/vanAll Light Vehicles
1975 13.5 11.1 11.9 11.0 11.1 13.1
1976 14.9 10.6 12.4 11.8 11.8 14.2
1977 15.6 12.2 13.6 12.8 12.5 15.1
1978 16.9 11.6 13.3 12.3 12.1 15.8
1979 17.2 14.3 13.2 10.5 11.5 15.9
1980 20.0 14.6 16.5 13.2 14.1 19.2
1981 21.4 14.7 17.9 14.3 14.8 20.5
1982 22.2 19.8 18.5 14.7 14.7 21.1
1983 22.1 20.7 18.9 15.8 15.1 21.0
1984 22.4 19.3 18.3 16.2 16.1 21.0
1985 23.0 20.1 18.2 16.5 16.5 21.3
1986 23.7 18.9 18.9 17.0 17.5 21.8
1987 23.8 19.4 19.0 17.3 17.7 22.0
1988 24.1 19.2 18.1 17.0 17.9 21.9
1989 23.7 19.1 17.8 16.6 17.8 21.4
1990 23.3 18.8 17.4 16.4 17.8 21.2
1991 23.4 18.2 18.2 16.7 17.9 21.3
1992 23.1 17.8 17.5 16.2 17.9 20.8
1993 23.5 17.0 17.6 16.3 18.2 20.9
1994 23.3 18.0 17.4 16.0 17.8 20.4
1995 23.4 17.8 16.9 16.0 18.1 20.5
1996 23.3 18.4 17.1 16.2 18.3 20.4
1997 23.4 19.2 16.8 16.1 18.2 20.2
1998 23.4 18.2 17.0 16.2 18.7 20.1
1999 23.0 18.5 16.3 16.1 18.3 19.7
2000 22.9 17.9 16.7 16.0 18.6 19.8
2001 23.0 18.8 16.0 16.4 18.0 19.6
2002 23.1 19.3 15.8 16.3 18.7 19.5
2003 23.3 19.9 16.1 16.4 19.0 19.6
2004 23.1 20.0 15.7 16.5 19.2 19.3
2005 23.5 20.2 15.8 16.7 19.3 19.9
2006 23.3 20.5 16.1 17.2 19.5 20.1
2007 24.1 20.6 16.2 17.7 19.5 20.6
2008 24.3 21.2 16.5 18.2 19.8 21.0
2009 25.3 22.0 16.9 19.3 20.1 22.4
2010 26.2 23.0 16.9 19.7 20.1 22.6
2011 26.1 23.7 17.2 19.8 21.0 22.4
2012 27.9 23.4 17.2 20.0 21.3 23.7
2013 28.6 24.5 17.4 20.9 21.1 24.3
2014 28.7 24.6 18.0 21.7 21.3 24.3
2015 29.4 25.3 18.8 22.0 21.9 24.8
2016 29.8 25.6 19.0 22.6 21.9 25.6

Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends Report: 1975 Through 2016, November 2016, EPA-420-R-16-010, Tables 2.1 and 3.1.

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EV Charging for Employees and Agency Fleets

  Federal requirements encourage   agencies to develop employee   charging policies, acquire electric   vehicles (EVs), and annually report on   charging infrastructure available for   employees. This First Thursday   Seminar provides fleet and facility managers with an overview of how meeting electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) goals can decrease greenhouse gas emissions, save money, and lead by example.

Expert presenters describes technical and financial considerations involved in electric vehicle charging, as well as legislation and executive orders impacts on agency EV acquisition, installation of EVSE for employees and fleets, and associated reporting requirements.

Learning Objectives

By completing this course you will learn to:

  • Understand new guidance on charging stations at the workplace
  • Recognize how federal electrification requirements affect your fleet
  • Develop cost-effective strategies that increase employee access to and use of charging stations
  • Plan, construct, and optimize fleet-level charging in agency infrastructure and operations
  • Apply best practices for management and safety during installation and use of charging stations
  • Access technical resources like the U.S. Department of Energy's Workplace Charging Challenge and the General Services Administration's Fleet Drive-Thru tool.

     Before the Training you must Register

 

Instructors

  • Sarah Olexsak, Workplace Charging Challenge Coordinator, U.S. Department of Energy. Read Bio.
  • Margaret Smith, Technical Support, Energetics Incorporated. Read Bio.
  • Cabell Hodge, Federal Fleet Project Leader, National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Read Bio.

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Meet Michael Berube

Via energy.gov 
Post by Erik Hyrkas on December 1, 2016

Michael Berube (left), the new director of the Vehicle Technologies Office, and Alan Liby, from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, look at a piece of partially oxidized material in the process of being converted into carbon fiber during a recent visit to the national laboratory in Tennessee.
Michael Berube (left), the new director of the Vehicle Technologies Office, and Alan Liby, from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, look at a piece of partially oxidized material in the process of being converted into carbon fiber during a recent visit to the national laboratory in Tennessee.


Michael Berube, the new director of the Energy Department’s Vehicle Technologies Office, sat down with the Amped Up! team recently to discuss his entry into vehicles, where we’re headed, and a love of off-roading.

WHERE DID YOU GET YOUR START IN VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES?

I am a transportation and civil engineer by background. I started my career working on highway and public transit projects in Boston and London. That led to an interest in understanding the policy and environmental implications behind transportation technical issues.

After about seven years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), as a student and a researcher, there was an opportunity at Chrysler looking for an expert in environmental and transportation policy. I started working there, and I spent 23 years at Chrysler.

AS DIRECTOR, WHAT DO YOU SEE AS YOUR TOP PRIORITIES?

I think one of the big challenges is looking at the combination of the advancements we made across batteries, engines, and fuels, combined with the great work that’s been done by our other offices. How do we look at bringing all of these together in a more systems approach to achieve dramatic improvements in energy efficiency?

WHAT ARE THE MOST REMARKABLE CHANGES YOU’VE SEEN FOR VEHICLES OVER THE YEARS?

By far, the most remarkable changes are those I have seen over the last two years. A combination of auto makers looking at mobility, autonomous cars and actually taking the driver out of the equation (or at least partly out of equation). This has combined with consumers willing to embrace new models of transportation and technology that can enable both trends. At the same time, you have a global push to reduce energy consumption from transportation while serving growing urban population. These trends are combining and will lead to a major disruption in vehicles.

Berube head.jpg
Berube worked at Chrysler for 23 years before coming to the Energy Department.
  WHAT KIND OF VEHICLES DO YOU FIND THE   MOST INTERESTING?

  I’ve been in [Washington,] D.C., a few months now,   and part of what I wanted to do was actually live in a   city and enjoy its benefits. Since I’ve gotten here, I   actually don’t drive. We have access to a car, but it has   only come out every few weeks when I have had to   pick up some furniture for the apartment. So far our   transportation has been on buses, Metro, and   Uber/Lyft rides.

That said, I will tell you from my car past, my kids and I do a lot of outdoors activities. We do a lot of backpacking and hiking. And as part of that, we’ve developed kind of a love for off-roading, and Jeeps are the classic off-roader. We love using some of those vehicles to get us to the trailheads when we go backpacking for a week and getting pretty far out into the wilderness sometimes.

WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO WHEN YOU’RE NOT FIGHTING FOR ALTERNATIVE, ENERGY EFFICIENT VEHICLES?

My passion outside of work and autos are two related things. I do a lot with my family through Boy Scouts. We have three Eagle Scouts in the family now, and we spend a lot of days and miles backpacking. We’ve hit at least half a dozen national parks around the country.

WHAT DO YOU WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW ABOUT YOU AS DIRECTOR OF THE VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE?

I’m passionate about transportation. I started my career as a civil and transportation engineer, because they are literally, “civilization’s engineers.” They are focused on how you build the things that society needs to function.

I’m very interested in how do we make the best possible transportation system we can. That includes providing great transportation for people, but doing it in a way that is sustainable, ultimately for our cities, where we live, and for the environment globally.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • The Vehicle Technologies Office supports research for hybrid drivetrains, advanced batteries, lightweight materials, advanced combustion and fuels, vehicle systems integration, and Clean Cities deployment activities.

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Fact of the Week

Via energy.gov 

Gasoline taxes in the United States were just under 30% of the price of a gallon of gasoline in 1990, and by 2015 taxes accounted for 19% - the lowest of the countries shown. Besides taxes, there are other cost components included in the price of gasoline, such as the cost of crude oil, refining, marketing and distribution. For France, Germany, and the United Kingdom, taxes comprised more than half of the total price for both of the years shown - 1990 and 2015. Japan's gasoline taxes were nearly half of the price in those years. In Canada, taxes were just above one-third of the price of gasoline in 2015, down from 40% in 1990. These are average prices and taxes collected by the International Energy Agency.

GASOLINE PRICES AND TAXES FOR SELECTED COUNTRIES, 1990 AND 2015

Gasoline Prices and Taxes for Canada, France, Germany, Japan, United Kingdom, and United States form  1990 and 2015

Fact #954 Dataset

SUPPORTING INFORMATION

Gasoline Prices and Taxes for Selected Countries, 1990 and 2015

 CanadaFranceGermanyJapanUnited KingdomUnited States
 199020151990201519902015199020151990201519902015
 Constant 2015 Dollars per Gallon
Taxes 1.35 1.15 4.67 3.60 3.01 3.70 2.70 2.08 3.09 4.43 0.56 0.45
Other Cost Components 2.04 2.07 1.92 2.08 1.79 2.17 3.03 2.22 2.03 2.00 1.54 1.97
Total Price 3.39 3.22 6.58 5.68 4.81 5.87 5.73 4.30 5.11 6.43 2.10 2.43
Percent Tax 40% 36% 71% 63% 63% 63% 47% 48% 60% 69% 27% 19%

Source: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 35, October 2016, Figure 10.2.

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