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    Fiscal Year 2019 Advanced Vehicle Technologies Research Funding Opportunity Announcement

    DE-FOA-0002014 FY19 VTO FOA

    Earlier this month, the US Department of Energy announced a funding opportunity of up to $59 million for "new and innovative advanced vehicle technologies research." The opportunity is being funded through the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the funding prioritizes research in the following areas:

    • Advanced batteries and electric drive systems
    • Energy efficient mobility systems (EEMS)
    • Materials for more efficient powertrains
    • Co-optimized advanced engine and fuel technologies
    • Alternative fuels and new mobility options

     

    FOA Issue Date:

    4/3/2019

    Submission Deadline for Concept Papers:

    5/1/2019 5:00 PM ET

    Anticipated Date of Concept Paper Notifications:

    5/20/2019

    Submission Deadline for Full Applications:

    6/19/2019 5:00 PM ET

    Anticipated Date for EERE Selection Notifications:

    August 2019

    Anticipated Timeframe for Award Negotiations

    September 2019

     

    The teaming arrangements specified in the FOA for the Technology Integration areas of interest highly encourage or require partnering with Clean Cities coalitions. Please see the Clean Cities Coalition Network for contact information for your local coalition.

    AOI 6 may be of particular interest to Clean Cities coalitions and their stakeholders: 

    1. AOI 6a: Alternative Fuel Vehicles (AFVs) and Infrastructure for Resiliency and Emergency Preparedness
    2. AOI 6b: New Mobility Services in Rural America
    3. AOI 6c: Alternative Fuel (e.g. natural gas) Proof-of-Concept in New Communities and Fleets
    4. AOI 6d: EV Data Collection
    5. AOI 6e: Open Topic

    Download the full FOA document for details on all of the areas of interest in this funding opportunity. For Louisiana, see the coalition contact information for Louisiana Clean Fuels and the Southwest Louisiana Clean Fuel Partnership (New Orleans coalition) below.

    For more information, including application requirements and deadlines, please visit the EERE Exchange website or Grants.gov

     

     

    Louisiana Clean Fuels

    Coordinator: Ann Vail
    ann@louisianacleanfuels.org
    225-342-7972
    Contact Us

    Parish Territory: All of Louisiana except for those parishes covered SLCFP

    Southeast Louisiana Clean Fuel Partnership

    Coordinator: Courtney Young
    504-483-8519
    slcfp@norpc.org

    Parish Territory: Jefferson, Orleans, Plaquemines, St. Bernard, St. Tammany, St. Charles, St. John the Baptist, and Tangipahoa

     

     


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    The U.S. Department of Energy, General Motors and MathWorks Launch EcoCAR Mobility Challenge

    WASHINGTON, Oct. 24, 2018 –The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), General Motors and MathWorks today announced the launch of the EcoCAR Mobility Challenge, the latest DOE-sponsored Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition (AVTC) revealing the 12 competing universities and the Chevrolet Blazer as the vehicle platform selected for the competition. 

    The headline sponsors are the U.S. Department of Energy, General Motors, and MathWorks, and the challenge is managed by Argonne National Laboratory, making EcoCAR the ultimate training ground for future leaders in the automotive industry.  

    “The future of transportation and mobility is evolving and bringing forth new technologies, challenges, and opportunities” said Acting Assistant Secretary, Cathy Tripodi. “The EcoCAR Mobility Challenge allows students to develop innovative technologies to keep America at the forefront of this changing landscape and provide consumers convenient, cost-effective options for personal mobility.”

    EcoCAR is a collegiate automotive competition aimed at developing a highly skilled, domestic workforce by providing hands-on experience designing and building next-generation mobility solutions to meet our nation’s future energy and mobility challenges. Participating teams will apply advanced propulsion systems, electrification, SAE Level 2 automation, and vehicle connectivity to improve the energy efficiency of a 2019 Chevrolet Blazer - all while balancing factors such as emissions, safety, utility, and consumer acceptability.  SAE Level 2 automation refers to a vehicle that combines automated functions, like acceleration and steering, but the driver must remain engaged with the driving task and monitor the environment at all times.

    EcoCAR teams will use onboard sensors and wireless communication from the vehicles surrounding environment to improve overall operation efficiency in the connected urban environment of the future. 

    General Motors will provide each team with a 2019 Chevrolet Blazer, which they have four years to design, integrate and refine into a new, advanced technology, energy-efficient mobility solution for the carsharing market. Teams will follow a real-world vehicle development process to meet rigorous technical constraints throughout the four-year competition, which will conclude in the summer of 2022.

    “We continue to support EcoCAR because students gain tremendous technical insights, leadership skills and hands-on experience while competing in AVTCs,” said Dan Nicholson, GM vice president, Global Propulsion Systems. “The challenges and solutions these students will develop working with their Chevrolet Blazers align with GM’s path to zero crashes, zero emissions and zero congestion.”

    A foundational principle of EcoCAR is the use of Model-Based Design, a mathematical and visual design approach using MATLAB and Simulink that enables users to quickly and cost-effectively manage projects, collaborate on designs, and develop complex embedded systems.

    “EcoCAR serves as an experimental laboratory, where students get to play and learn with real world tools and technologies that will help them secure jobs and build careers,” said Lauren Tabolinsky, academic program manager, MathWorks. “We are excited to once again partner with the DOE and GM in supporting this next generation of engineers as they adopt multi-disciplinary design and development approaches to experiment, fine-tune and succeed in this challenge.”

    To be successful, universities will need to recruit a diverse team of students and faculty, spanning many engineering disciplines such as mechanical, electrical, computer and software engineering, as well as communications, marketing and project management. This multi-disciplinary emphasis imitates a real-world automotive industry environment and provides graduates the technical and leadership skills needed to enter the field fully prepared for careers that will help shape the energy and mobility industry for years to come.

    The participating universities include:

    • Colorado State University (Fort Collins, CO)
    • Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (Daytona Beach, FL)
    • Georgia Tech (Atlanta, GA)
    • McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario, Canada)
    • Mississippi State University (Starkville, MS)
    • The Ohio State University (Columbus, OH)
    • University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa, AL)
    • University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN)
    • University of Washington (Seattle, WA)
    • University of Waterloo (Waterloo, Ontario, Canada)
    • Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA)
    • West Virginia University (Morgantown, WV)

    “EcoCAR puts students in the driver’s seat of their education by providing hands-on, technical training mirroring the real-world product development process of a General Motors vehicle,” said Kristen Wahl, director of the Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition (AVTC) program at Argonne National Laboratory. “In the face of increasing global competition, EcoCAR showcases North America’s best and brightest students in STEM and exemplifies American competitiveness in automotive engineering.”

    EcoCAR builds on a proud 30-year history of DOE AVTCs that exemplify the power of public-private partnerships in providing invaluable hands-on skills to promising, young minds ready to enter the workforce. AVTCs influence and shape engineering curriculum at the university level to cultivate future transportation leaders and enhance the North American engineering workforce.

    Other participating sponsors include: NXP Semiconductors, Inc.; National Science Foundation; Intel Corporation; American Axle Manufacturing; Robert Bosch, LLC; PACCAR, Inc.; dSPACE, Inc.; Siemens PLM Software; Denso International America; Horiba; Delphi Technologies; California Air Resources Board; Proterra, Inc; tesa Tape; Vector North America, Inc.; The Electric Power Research Institute, Inc.

    For more information about the student engineering program, the participating schools or the competition sponsors, please visit avtcseries.org.


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    DOE Teams Up to Advance Natural Gas Vehicle Research

    Natural Gas Powered Heavy Duty TruckLiterally and figuratively, vehicles are driving the U.S. economy. Vehicles transport 11 billion tons of freight annually, which is about $35 billion worth of goods each day,[1] and Americans drive more than 3 trillion vehicle-miles per year.[2]  As the transportation sector continues to grow, diversified affordable solutions will ensure resiliency and affordability, while meeting increasing energy demands. Natural gas is poised to play a key role as a versatile, low-emission fuel and is an increasingly attractive alternative to conventional diesel fuel.

    To help advance natural gas vehicle technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), California Energy Commission, and South Coast Air Quality Management District have partnered to launch a research effort to drive past technical barriers to the increased use of natural gas for medium- and heavy-duty engines and vehicles.

    As part of this effort, NREL issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) to award up to $11 million for projects that focus on: (1) reducing the cost natural gas vehicles, (2) increasing vehicle efficiency, and (3) advancing new innovative medium- and heavy-duty natural gas engine designs. This RFP builds on the lessons-learned from the partners’ broad experiences in natural gas vehicle technologies.

    Projects selected through this solicitation will complement Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) research started in FY 2017 to improve the performance, reliability, durability, cost-effectiveness, and efficiency of natural gas vehicles. VTO’s work and the RFP announced today build are informed through stakeholder outreach and workshops to identify key research needs. Cost-effectively achieving diesel-like efficiency in natural gas engines, while meeting emissions standards, will improve the viability of natural gas fueled medium- and heavy-duty vehicles.

    For more information about the RFP, please visit.  https://www.fbo.gov/spg/DOE/NREL/NR/RHQ-8-82305/listing.html

     

    [1] Bureau of Transportation Statistics, DOT, Transportation Statistics Annual Report 2017, Table 3-1.  https://www.bts.gov/bts-publications/transportation-statistics-annual-reports/tsar-2017 )

    [2] Transportation Energy Data Book 36th Edition, ORNL, 2017. Table 3.7 Shares of Highway Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Vehicle Type, 1970-2015.


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    FOTW #1046: The Average Household Vehicle Was Driven 10,200 Miles in 2017

    The average of all household vehicles driven in 2017 was 10,200 miles. Newer vehicles are typically driven more miles than older vehicles. Vehicles with ages of one to five years all average over 12,000 miles per year. The vehicles that are over nine years old average 7,800 miles per year.

    Average annual miles per vehicle by vehicle age in 2017

    Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, National Household Travel Survey website, accessed June 6, 2018.

    Fact #1046 Dataset


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    Transportation Analysis Fact of the Week #1045

    77%-82% of Energy Put into an Electric Car is Used to Move the Car Down the Road

    Unlike conventionally fueled vehicles, electric vehicles experience a loss of energy during “refueling,” with an energy loss of about 16% from the wall power to the battery during charging. However, electric vehicles are otherwise highly efficient delivering 60%-65% of the energy from the wall power to the road even before energy is reclaimed through regenerative braking. When energy gains from regenerative braking are included, the amount of energy used for traveling down the road can rise to more than 80% in the EPA-combined city and highway driving cycle.

    Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving - Electric Vehicles

    Source: U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Fuel Economy Guide website.

    View the supporting data for this Fact of the Week.

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    EERE Fact of the Week #1044

    Transportation Analysis Fact of the Week #1044

    August 27, 2018

    12-30% of Energy Put into a Conventional Car is Used to Move the Car Down the Road

    Not all of the fuel that is put into a car's fuel tank is used to move the car down the road. In fact, only 12-30% of the energy put into a conventional car is use d for that purpose. The rest of the energy is lost to engine inefficiencies or used to power accessories. The amount of energy loss varies depending on the type of driving – city, highway, or combined city and highway. The engine losses, such as exhaust heat and pumping, are higher for city driving than for highway driving. There are no idle losses in highway driving, but losses due to wind resistance and rolling resistance are higher for highway driving than city driving. All in all, there is great potential to improve vehicle fuel efficiencies with advanced technologies, such as hybridization, that address these losses.

    Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving

    Source: U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Fuel Economy Guide website.

    View the supporting data for this Fact of the Week


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    EERE #1041: Households Take Fewer Vehicle Trips in 2017

    Transportation Analysis Fact of the Week #1041

    August 6, 2018

    Households Take Fewer Vehicle Trips in 2017

    The average number of vehicle trips made by a household in a year’s time was 1,865 in 2017, which translates to an average of 5 household trips per day (one-way).  That is 10% lower than the previous survey year, 2009, and 20% lower than the 1995 survey.  In 2017 there were fewer trips per household for work, shopping, other family/personal errands, and social & recreational purposes.  The rise in internet shopping, telecommuting, and social networking via the internet may be a factor in the decline, as total trips per household has been declining since 1995.

    Number of Vehicle Trips per Household by Trip Purpose, 1969-2017

    Note: A vehicle trip is defined as one start and end movement from location to location in a single privately-operated vehicle regardless of the number of persons in the vehicle.

    Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, National Household Travel Surveywebsite, accessed June 6, 2018.

    View the supporting data for this Fact of the Week


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    EERE Fact of the Week #1037

    Transportation Analysis Fact of the Week #1037

     

    July 09, 2018

    Model Year 2017 Vehicles Were More Fuel Efficient with Improved Horsepower and Acceleration

    Generally, increased performance comes as a trade-off with fuel economy.  But light vehicle manufacturers have been able to employ advanced technologies to improve both performance and fuel economy. Despite a 123% increase in horsepower and 48% improvement in acceleration (measured by time to accelerate from 0 to 60 miles per hour) from model year 1980 to 2017, the fuel economy of vehicles improved 31%. The data are based on production-weighted averages. In the 1990s and early 2000s, fuel economy decreased while vehicle weight increased. Fuel economy has improved nearly every year since 2004. 

    Characteristics of New Light Vehicles, 1980-2017

    Note:  Data are production-weighted averages for each model year and do not represent any individual vehicle. Data for model year 2017 are preliminary.

    Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 through 2017, EPA-420-S-18-001, January 2018.

    View the supporting data for this Fact of the Week


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    EERE Fact of the Week #1035

    Transportation Analysis Fact of the Week #1035

    State Gasoline Tax Rates, January 2018

    June 25, 2018

    Pennsylvania Has the Highest State Gasoline Taxes

    In addition to the 18.4 cents per gallon federal gasoline tax, the states also tax gasoline at varying rates.  Some states have sales and/or use taxes added to gasoline excise taxes while others have inspection fees, environmental fees, leaking underground storage tank taxes, etc.  The Energy Information Administration has compiled gasoline excise taxes, along with other state taxes and fees, to arrive at an estimate of the amount of state taxes consumers are paying per gallon. According to these estimates, Pennsylvania currently has the highest per gallon tax rate for gasoline; the Pennsylvania rate includes the Oil Company Franchise Tax, a variable rate tax adjusted annually, and the Underground Storage Tank Indemnification Fund fee. Alaska, with a 9-cent gasoline tax rate, has by far the lowest gasoline tax rate of any state.

    Note: Includes gasoline tax plus other per gallon fees, such as leaking underground storage tank fees. See source for additional specifics on individual state rates.       

    Source: Energy Information Administration, Petroleum Supply Monthly, Federal and state motor fuels taxes, accessed May 16, 2018.

    View the supporting data for this Fact of the Week


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    Plug-in Vehicles Consumed Nearly Two Terawatt-hours of Electricity in 2017

    Fact of the Week #1030

    The amount of electricity consumed by plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) has increased nearly 100 times from 0.02 terawatt-hours in 2011 to 1.94 terawatt-hours in 2017. The share of electricity consumption from all-electric (BEV) increased compared to the electricity consumption from plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). In 2017, BEVs accounted for about 57% of all PEV electricity consumption while PHEVs accounted for the remaining 43%.

     

    Total electricity consumption by plug-in electric vehicles from 2010 to 2017

    Source: Argonne National Laboratory, Impacts of Electrification of Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States, 2010-2017, ANL/ESD-18/1, January 2018.

    Fact #1030 Dataset


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