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    LCF Member Spotlight: SporTran's Electric and CNG Bus Fleet

    SporTran’s mission is to provide safe, reliable, and sustainable transportation for Shreveport and Bossier, Louisiana.

    Fleet Name: SporTran

    Vehicles: 5 Proterra Electric Buses and 36 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Buses

    Domicile Site: Shreveport, Louisiana

    Fleet Purpose: Fixed route paratransit service

    Alternative Fuel or Technology: Electric and CNG

    When Started: SporTran has been operating a transit service since the 1870s and began switching to alternative fuel vehicles in 2010, replacing their last diesel bus in 2017 with the purchase of 5 Proterra buses.

    Leadership: SporTran’s President and CEO, Dinero Washington, has been an incredible leader with SporTran but also as President of Louisiana’s Public Transportation Association.

    Vision: SporTran’s mission is to provide safe, reliable, and sustainable transportation for Shreveport and Bossier, Louisiana. An integral part of this mission is their switch to alternative fuels in their fleet, which has resulted in less vehicle downtime, fuel and maintenance cost saves, and cleaner air for the citizens that SporTran serves. SporTran was the first fleet in Louisiana to operate a 100% alternative fuel fleet, and the first transportation fleet in the state to operate electric buses. The purchase of their 5 Proterra buses is projected to save the fleet $2.2 million in fuel and maintenance costs over their 12-year lifetime, and SporTran expects to purchase more Proterra buses as they replace older vehicles. In 2017 alone, SporTran’s dedication to alternative fuel vehicles has offset the production of over 500,000 gasoline-gallon equivalents of petroleum and over 1,500 tons of greenhouse gas emissions.

    Left to right: Dinero Washington, President and CEO of SporTran; Ann Vail, Executive Director of Louisiana Clean Fuels; Dale Hill, Founder of Proterra

    Louisiana’s Governor John Bel Edwards talking at the 2017 ribbon cutting for SporTran’s five new Proterra buses.

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    FOTW #1064: Median All-Electric Vehicle Range Grew from 73 Miles in Model Year 2011 to 125 Miles in Model Year 2018

    In model year 2011, the full-charge range of all-electric vehicles (AEV) spanned from 63 to 94 miles. By model year 2018, the available ranges expanded, from a minimum of 58 miles to a maximum of 335 miles, giving a median increase of 52 miles.

    In model year 2011, there were just three different models of all-electric vehicles (AEV) available and their ranges on a full charge (according to the Environmental Protection Agency) spanned from 63 to 94 miles. By model year 2018, the number of AEV models increased to 14 and the available ranges expanded as well, from a minimum of 58 miles for the Smart Fortwo Electric Drive Coupe to a maximum of 335 miles for the Tesla Model S 100D. From 2011 to 2018, the median of the AEV ranges increased by 52 miles – from 73 to 125 miles.

    Note: Median is based on the models listed in the supporting data spreadsheet; some of these AEV models are available with different battery capacities/body styles, which have shorter ranges.

    Source: U. S. Department of Energy, FuelEconomy.Gov data, accessed December 4, 2018.

    View the supporting data for this Fact of the Week!

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    Louisiana Clean Fuels Launches DC Fast Charger Crowdsourcing Website

    Organization seeks input from potential site hosts and electric vehicle owners in the creation of a DC Fast Charger network along interstate corridors.

    Organization seeks input from potential site hosts and electric vehicle owners in the creation of a DC Fast Charger network along interstate corridors.

    As the popularity of electric vehicles rises, so too does the need for fast, convenient charging locations along well-traveled interstates throughout the state. Louisiana Clean Fuels (LCF), along with a team of experts and collaborators, is working to create a Master Plan for a DC Fast Charger corridor that will meet Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) guidelines and create a wide range of benefits for local drivers and business owners.

    With this end in mind, LCF recently launched a crowdsourcing website to gather input from electric vehicle owners and potential site hosts. This project allows these stakeholders the opportunity to be a part of the decision-making process on where to place DC Fast Chargers along Louisiana’s interstate corridors.

    Currently, driving long-distance with an electric vehicle in Louisiana can be a challenge, and drivers can often be left searching for level 2 chargers that take a long time to use. The creation of this DC Fast Charging network will give electric vehicle owners of all makes more freedom to take their EVs on longer trips.

    The DC Fast Charger crowdsourcing website offers electric vehicle owners most impacted by the project the chance to have their recharging needs considered in the planning of the charging network. Ideally, this will enable the project to move forward in such a way that will benefit the maximum number of electric vehicle owners. As LCF and its assembled data experts work to create the Master Plan, we wish to consider the most convenient and vital locations for hosting a DC Fast Charger, locations that will be most beneficial to the drivers that will use them.

    LCF is asking electric vehicle owners to think about their commute along the interstate where they normally stop for rest breaks and drop a “pin” where they know their car could benefit from a charging station. If someone has already nominated a site that they agree with, then participants can "like" that item and leave a comment about that location.

    Local business owners and government entities also have the opportunity to have their voices heard by nominating their location to be a potential site host for these proposed charging stations. Hosting a charging station can offer a wide range of benefits; not only would hosting a charging station support the environmentally-friendly use of alternative fuels, help to meet corporate emissions standards and goals, and increase property value, hosting will also serve to attract new customers who drive electric vehicles. These customers, drawn in by the charging stations, will visit more frequently and stay on property longer as their vehicles charge.

    The data collected in the crowd sourcing website will be combined with highway data, economic data of potential sites, and vehicle data from multiple sources along with existing infrastructure that will reveal optimal charging sites along the corridor. When the plan is complete, we will work with our stakeholders to find funding to get chargers installed at the best sites.

    With the input of local stakeholders in mind, LCF is working to create a DC Fast Charger network that will benefit Louisiana residents and businesses and advance the viability of electricity as an alternative fuel.

    Visist the site at https://louisianacleanfuels.mysocialpinpoint.com/cleanfuels#/

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    Transportation Analysis Fact of the Week #1045

    Unlike conventionally fueled vehicles, electric vehicles experience a loss of energy during “refueling." Learn more about where all the energy put into an EV goes in this blog post.

    77%-82% of Energy Put into an Electric Car is Used to Move the Car Down the Road

    Unlike conventionally fueled vehicles, electric vehicles experience a loss of energy during “refueling,” with an energy loss of about 16% from the wall power to the battery during charging. However, electric vehicles are otherwise highly efficient delivering 60%-65% of the energy from the wall power to the road even before energy is reclaimed through regenerative braking. When energy gains from regenerative braking are included, the amount of energy used for traveling down the road can rise to more than 80% in the EPA-combined city and highway driving cycle.

    Energy Requirements for Combined City/Highway Driving - Electric Vehicles

    Source: U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Fuel Economy Guide website.

    View the supporting data for this Fact of the Week.

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    Louisiana DC Fast Charging Corridor Master Plan

    LCF is working on a statewide master plan for a DC Fast Charging network along our interstate corridors that also meets the standards for the FHWA Alternative Fuel Corridors signage.

    Updated 12/27/2018 - With the exception of Tesla owners, electric car owners in Louisiana currently do not have an adequate charging infrastructure along our interstate corridors. While the daily commute for a typical EV owner in their hometowns may be workable, taking their EV on road trips can often be a hassle. Louisiana Clean Fuels is currently looking for additional partners to help complete a master plan to create a well-designed charging infrastructure along our interstate corridors. The plan, explained below, will provide future site hosts with a business case to install EVSE at select sites across our state. We will also work with our stakeholders to secure funding to help offset the cost of installation. Support this project with a donation today!

    NEWCrowd sourcing website launched to collect input from EV owners and potential site hosts [ https://louisianacleanfuels.mysocialpinpoint.com]

    Background:

    On November 30, 2017, Louisiana submitted its proposal to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) for alternative fuel corridors. The state submitted proposals for three fuels along specific sections of our interstate system. On March 8, 2018, the state received notification of the approved signage-ready and signage-pending corridors. The fuels that received approval for corridors signage in Louisiana are CNG, Propane and LNG. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) and Louisiana Clean Fuels (LCF) will now begin work with the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (LDOTD) to have the necessary signage produced so that the corridor is clearly marked.

    The Opportunity:

    The only fuel that did not qualify for signage was charging for electric vehicles. Under the FHWA guidelines, DC Fast Chargers must be spaced a maximum of 50 miles apart, each within 5 miles of the interstate in order for the corridor to be eligible for signage. To jump start the development of an electric charging corridor along our interstate system, LCF proposes creating a DC Fast Charging Master Plan for the state of Louisiana.

    The Plan:

    LCF has assembled a team of data experts, OEMs, EVSE experts, electric utilities and MPOs to begin work on a two-part plan. The first part of the Master Plan is to create the business case for potential DC Fast Charging sites that is backed up with comprehensive data which will aid in identifying the best locations for DC Fast Chargers along our interstates. LCF will collect highway data, economic data of the potential sites, and vehicle data from multiple sources along with existing infrastructure. The data will be used to conduct analyses and modeling that will reveal optimal DC Fast Charging sites in Louisiana.

    The second part of the Master Plan process is to conduct regional outreach meetings in the different planning commission / MPO territories across the state. Both LCF and LDEQ will host these round table meetings with area businesses, utilities, and elected officials in order to facilitate local acceptance and demand for EVSE charging infrastructure along their critical corridors.

    EVSE Site Ranking Criteria

    LCF will prioritize locations around the state for possible DC Fast Charging EVSE installations utilizing the Sawatch EVSE siting analytics and site ranking criteria such as, but not limited to:

    • Access to shopping and dining
    • Access to a recreational facility
    • Safety (well-lit, low-crime)
    • Electrical Capacity (408 volt, 3-phase power)
    • Within 5-miles of an Interstate
    • Preferred by utility service provider
    • Preferred by local government
    • Co-located with other Public EVSE
    • Co-located with Tesla Charging
    • Co-located with a hotel
    • Publicly accessible parking garages

    How can you help?

    Sponsors are being sought to fund the Louisiana Statewide DC Fast Charging Corridor Master Plan. All funds will go directly to paying for Phase 1 of the plan: acquisition of data sets and fees paid to LCF’s contractors for the modeling and analysis of potential sites along our interstate corridor. The completed plan will provide a business case for potential DC Fast Charging host sites. All sponsors will get access to the final plan for three months before the Master Plan is published. Additionally, entities from all sponsorship levels will be invited to participate in the Master Plan committee meetings, regional outreach meetings, and will receive recognition in all press releases and events related to promotion of and/or completion of the study.

    Thank you to our sponsors!

    Kilowatt Sponsors

     

    Sponsorships for the Master Plan are available in 4 levels:

    Terawatt: $50,000 +

    • Top-level logo positioning on cover page of the study
    • Top-level membership with LCF for one year ($5,000 value)
    • Speaking opportunity and top-level sponsorship at the 2018 Fall Clean Fuel Leader Awards or the January 2019 Annual Stakeholder Meeting

    Gigawatt: $25,000 +

    • Secondary-level logo positioning on cover page of the study
    • Platinum-level membership with LCF for one year ($2,500 value)
    • Free lunch sponsorship of LCF event of your choice ($300 value)

    Megawatt: $10,000 +

    • Tertiary-level logo positioning on cover page of the study
    • Gold-level membership with LCF for one year ($1,000 value)

    Kilowatt: $5,000 +

    • Company name listed as a sponsor in the study
    • Silver-level membership in LCF for one year ($500 value)
    • Free exhibit space at an LCF event of your choice ($150 value)

    Two ways to donate:

    1. PayPal

    2. Check
    Please make checks payable to Louisiana Clean Fuels and mail to PO Box 1771, Baton Rouge, LA 70821. Please indicate sponsorship level on the check.

    More information is available upon request. Email: ann@louisianacleanfuels.org

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