Blog

    LCF Publishes 2019 Annual Report Data Showing Hopeful Future for Louisiana’s Air Quality

    Historically, a number of parishes in Louisiana have struggled to remain in compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Air Act. When parishes are out of compliance, referred to as being in non-attainment status, their ozone levels may threaten the health of those in the area, particularly children, the elderly, or those with respiratory conditions. Ozone, a respiratory irritant, is created through reactions between nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC), which are primarily produced by road transportation. Since 2000, Louisiana Clean Fuels has worked to transition Louisiana’s transportation sector to cleaner, alternative fuel technologies that produce less NOx and lower transportation emissions that threaten the health of Louisianians and keep the state in non-attainment status. The report below details the progress of this transition to alternative fuel technologies.

    The data we collect is used as a benchmark to gain an accurate picture of alternative fuel and vehicle usage in Louisiana, which will help both LCF and the Department of Energy understand the alternative fuels market and the progress we are making towards our greenhouse gas emission reduction goals. This Annual Report allows us to track the growth of the different alternative fuel market sectors and identify which projects are most effective at reducing emissions. We also use the data we collect for the Annual Report in the consideration of recipients for the 2020 Annual Clean Fuel Leader Awards.

    After months of collecting and analyzing the data, the Annual Report is complete, and our findings are ready to be shared.

    In 2019, LCF stakeholders reduced usage of a total of 9,422,169 gallons of gasoline-equivalent (GGEs). Primarily, this was achieved through the usage of alternative fuel vehicles (66%) rather than vehicles that run on gasoline or diesel. Other methods of reduction worth mentioning are fuel economy improvements (16%) in vehicles and idle reduction measures (14%), both of which focus on decreasing fuel consumption in vehicles. Not only do our stakeholders use vehicle improvements to reduce fossil fuel consumption, but a large number of them are also diversifying their fuel options and switching to other fuels besides gasoline and diesel to power their fleets.

    • Members of LCF’s Green Fleets Certification Program used over three million gallons of alternative fuel, accounting for 34% of our stakeholders’ GGE Reductions. 
    • From 2017 to 2019, East Baton Rouge School district increased their number of propane-fueled buses from 10 to 60 with a corresponding propane fuel use increase of over 1400%. Lafourche school district also increased its usage of propane-fueled school buses, using 25% more propane in 2019 than in 2017.



    In addition to reducing petroleum usage, LCF stakeholders also reduced 45,673 tons of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2019. Idle reduction (37%) and improvements in fuel economy (42%) were responsible for the majority of the reduction of GHG emissions. As these measures reduce overall fuel consumption for any vehicle, AFV or not, these kinds of measures have the largest impact on keeping emissions down during the transition to cleaner alternative fuels that reduce emissions even further. As investment in alternative fuel fleets continues to rise, replacing older diesel and gasoline vehicles, GHG emissions reduced by AFVs will increasingly account for a larger share of emissions reductions in Louisiana.

    This third chart shows a breakdown in the GGEs reduced and the GHG emissions reduced by fuel type. In 2019, LCF stakeholders reduced 6,413,389 GGE and 8,374 tons of GHG emissions specifically through alternative fuel usage. Louisiana is known for having a very strong natural gas industry, and this data illustrates that compressed natural gas (CNG) is indeed an incredibly popular alternative fuel for our stakeholders. CNG accounts for 70% of the GGEs reduced but only 47% of the GHG emissions reduced in 2019. Also of note in GGE reduction is propane, which accounted for 19% of the 6.4 million total for 2019. Biodiesel (25%) and renewable natural gas (RNG) (12%) played a notable role in our stakeholders’ reduction of GHG emissions in 2019, despite accounting for only 1.6% and 3.7% respectively of the petroleum reductions by our stakeholders, showing the dramatic effectiveness of biodiesel and RNG at reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    Compared to 2018, total levels of GHG and GGE reduced remain relatively the same. The amount of CNG reported used by stakeholders in 2019 dropped by 15% from the previous year, which accounts for a drop in GHG and GGE reduced. In addition to a nearly twenty-fold increase in biodiesel usage from 2018, GGE reduced from Propane and RNG usage increased by 50% and 30%, respectively, offsetting most of the drop in GGE reduced from CNG. While decreases in CNG usage are noteworthy, the respective increases in Propane and RNG, in particular, are representative of an increasingly diverse alternative fuel usage among LCF stakeholders.


    Read More

    FOTW #1151: Lithium-Ion Battery Capacity for New All-Electric Vehicles Sold in the United States Reached a Record High in 2019

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    With a 1% increase in sales and increasing battery pack size, all-electric vehicles (EVs) captured a record amount of total plug-in vehicle battery capacity sold in 2019, 17.4 gigawatt-hours. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) accounted for a smaller portion of total plug-in vehicle battery capacity due to their lower sales volumes and because they require smaller battery packs than EVs, since they have gasoline-powered engines to extend total vehicle range. PHEV sales decreased 32% from 2018 to 2019, about the same as the decrease in PHEV battery capacity. Calendar year 2018 was the first full year of Tesla Model 3 sales, which accounted for the large increase in total battery capacity between 2017 and 2018.

    Source: Argonne National Laboratory, Assessment of Light-Duty Plug-In Electric Vehicles in the United States, 2010 – 2019, June 2020.

    Fact #1151 Dataset

    Read the original article


    Read More

    Clean, Green and Quiet: Baton Rouge's Newest Transit Buses are Electric!

    By LCF Intern, Olivia Montgomery & Executive Director, Ann Vail

    Have you seen the smart looking green and yellow CATS buses driving around Baton Rouge? These “green” new buses are so quiet that many Baton Rouge residents may not have noticed them yet. In 2019, Capital Area Transit System (CATS), the transit authority in Baton Rouge, added three new electric buses to its fleet, with hopes to continue the transition to electric in years to come. CATS currently has three 35-foot electric BYD buses in operation and three more were ordered in December. The agency will be ordering an additional  three electric BYD buses by October 2020.  

    While it is not uncommon to see electric buses in the fleets of larger cities, they are more of a rarity in mid-sized Southern cities like Baton Rouge. So what prompted CATS to make this addition to their fleet? In 2014, CATS commissioned a study by the University of New Orleans Transportation Institute in order to review alternative fuel options for its fleet. At the time, CATS knew that some of its fleet would reach its useful age and need to be replaced. This set the stage to commission a study to assist with determining whether alternatively fueled buses could reduce costs and promote environmental sustainability. 

    At the time the study was commissioned, CATS buses burned through about 2,000 gallons of fuel per day. The CATS fleet currently has 57 conventional diesel buses, 3 trolleys, and 16 cutaway vans. A variety of alternative fuel options are available for public transit fleets, including compressed natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, biodiesel, and electric or hybrid-electric, but the UNO study specifically recommended the switch to electric. After weighing specifics like feasibility and climate conditions specific to Baton Rouge, CATS decided to follow UNO’s recommendation to go electric. 

    Procuring buses with new technologies is not always easy. CATS was charged with quickly finding funding sources and a manufacturer that could meet deadlines on deliverables. Around this time, Louisiana Clean Fuels hosted an electric bus demonstration at the transit shelter in town square and invited local decision makers, CATS staff, and board members along for the ride. On this ride, LCF and their stakeholders were able to inform CATS of an upcoming FTA grant opportunity and offered to provide assistance with their grant application. The demo was a success and solidified local leadership’s support for CATS’s decision to procure electric buses. 

    CATS applied for the competitive grant funding – with assistance from Capital Region Planning Commission, Louisiana Department of Transportation – from the Federal Transit Administration’s Low to No- Emissions Program and received $2.5 million in 2019, in combination with other Federal funds, to purchase their first three buses.

    In April 2020, CATS announced it received an additional $3.8 million FTA grant to procure additional buses. CATS also received some local matching funds for the project. The FTA Low to No Emissions program is the same grant that in 2016 awarded $3.9 million to Sportran in Shreveport LA to purchase its first five electric buses, three depot chargers and an on-route fast charger. The Shreveport transit agency also received $1.5 million in August of 2018 for additional electric buses. 

    If one could offer advice to another fleet looking to procure electric buses, CATS Communications Director, Amie McNaylor, says she suggests engaging the experts. McNaylor credits the help of industry experts in navigating the process of procuring buses with unfamiliar technology. McNaylor described that, during the ordering process, electric bus batteries improved from first generation to second generation batteries with longer ranges, and having an expert around smoothed out these bumps in the process. Louisiana Clean Fuels connected CATS staff with industry experts and experienced EV transit bus fleet managers who acted as a liaison of sorts between CATS and the manufacturer, asking the right questions and finding the right specifications for CATS’ unique needs. 

    After hammering out the details, CATS ultimately purchased three 35-foot electric buses manufactured in California by BYD. These buses can reach 62 miles per hour speeds and seat 32 passengers, with additional capacity for standing passengers. BYD estimates its buses cost about $1 less per mile to operate when compared to diesel buses. CATS will also save on maintenance costs as electric vehicles do not require oil changes. 

    Aside from cost savings and emissions reduction, McNaylor says the public has responded favorably to the new electric buses. Some riders have tweeted that the buses are much quieter, and people tend to be drawn to the electric buses at press events. CATS operators seem to enjoy driving the new buses as well. 

    So what’s next for CATS? CATS is continuing to work on expanding the electric vehicles in the agency’s fleet. Additional electric buses will be purchased that will serve as the flagship of the Plank/Nicholson Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Corridor, a collaboration with the City-Parish and Build Baton Rouge  These buses will make possible the 15-20 frequency of the morning and afternoon peak hours on the BRT corridor; there will be 30 minute frequency during the basetime of the route. However, CATS does plan to continue to procure more electric buses in the future, and it is expected that the CATS Board of Commissioners will approve the purchase of the final three buses on the agency’s contract with BYD, bringing an eventual total of nine electric buses in the fleet. In the meantime, the three recently-ordered buses are in the manufacturing process and will be incorporated into the fleet soon, and CATS also hopes to install more electric bus charging stations at its maintenance facility. 


    Read More

    Progress in electric vehicle range and emissions

    Originally posted to Fuels Fix | Original Article

    Demystifying emissions comparisons and the viability of electric vehicles for Louisiana residents and businesses with new data and research.

    Just 10 years ago, the electric vehicle industry began expanding and limited research was available about the vehicle benefits, capabilities, or impacts. Over the last few years, EV production has been a rapidly changing industry as car manufacturers address climate concerns and customer needs. With new technology and years of progress, our knowledge on EVs has developed, and new research can provide us with the answers to our previous concerns or misconceptions. 

    EV Well-to-Wheel Emissions Misconceptions

    Vehicle emissions can be broken into two categories: air pollutants and greenhouse gases. When comparing these emissions, there are two forms of analysis: direct and well-to-wheels. Direct emissions are those coming from the use of the vehicle and are also known as tailpipe emissions. The operation of electric vehicles (EVs) produces no tailpipe emissions, but there are still emissions associated with these vehicles. Well-to-wheel emissions include all emissions related to fuel production, processing, distribution, and use. For gasoline vehicles, well-to-wheel emissions come from the extraction, refining, and distribution of petroleum, while electric vehicle emissions are produced by the electric power plants and the extraction and processing of the primary energy sources used for electricity production. The actual amount of emissions associated with EVs is dependent on the makeup of the electricity grid where the vehicle is charged. 

    One misconception when discussing well-to-wheel emissions from electric vehicles is that electric grids with primary sources of electricity coming from fossil fuels will result in higher emissions for EVs than the average gasoline vehicle. While the exact emissions data does depend on the electricity sources, well-to-wheel emissions of electric vehicles are generally still significantly cleaner than gasoline or diesel-powered vehicles. This is largely due to their fuel economies: EVs convert over 77% of the electrical energy from the grid to power while conventional gasoline vehicles only convert about 12-30% of the energy from gasoline to power. According to Argonne National Lab’s Assessment of Light-Duty Plug-In Electric Vehicles in the United States, this efficiency resulted in energy savings from light-duty plug-in electric vehicles of 44.8 trillion Btu, or 470 million gallons of gasoline in 2019 alone. 

    In Louisiana, our reliance on fossil fuels for energy can result in slightly higher electricity emissions than other renewable-based states. Based on the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s analysis on the electricity generation in Louisiana, approximately 72% of our state’s energy comes from natural gas. While the emissions levels for natural gas are much greater than what is possible with renewable energy sources, it still has much lower greenhouse gas emissions than coal or oil. This results in significantly lower emissions for electric vehicles in Louisiana than gasoline vehicles, and this trend will continue as our energy generation becomes cleaner.


    Image: Per vehicle emissions based on Louisiana’s power mix (Source: https://afdc.energy.gov/vehicles/electric_emissions.html)

    For further analysis on EV emissions in Louisiana, the U.S. Department of Energy has created a ‘Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Calculator’ which allows users to choose an electric or plug-in hybrid vehicle, input their location by zip code, and compare total well-to-wheels emissions of their car to the average new gasoline vehicle. Using this for a 2020 Chevy Bolt in Baton Rouge, the electric vehicle’s emissions are estimated to be 120 grams of CO2 per mile (gCO2/mi) while the average new gasoline vehicle emissions are estimated as 410 gCO2/mi. 

    EV Battery Emissions and Progress 

    Another topic that is recently evolving in relation to electric vehicle emissions is the impacts of battery production. Different studies, summarized by the International Council on Clean Transportation in 2018, have shown different emissions impacts, ranging from 56 to 494 kg CO2e/kWh with an average estimation at 150 kg CO2e/kWh. This translates to about 56 gCO2/mi. Based on the reports mentioned previously, gasoline vehicles are responsible for about 100-290 gCO2/mi more than EVs. 

    The International Energy Agency conducted its own study on a ten-year comparative life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions analysis based on 2018 data in their recently released Global EV Outlook 2020. Their comparison shows that batteries represent about a third of electric vehicles’ lifetime emissions; however, the total CO2 emissions of the ten-year life-cycle for a battery electric vehicle (BEV) with an 80kWh capacity (or about 370 mi. range) is currently approximately 20% less than the emissions of a comparable internal combustion vehicle life-cycle. Thus, while EV batteries are still associated with substantial emissions, it does not outweigh the benefits of reduced emissions associated with the use of EVs. As battery technology and recycling improve and EV designs become more efficient and cost-effective, the life-cycle emissions of an EV are expected to continue to decrease, while increasing costs of achieving better fuel efficiency in combustion vehicles will limit reductions to GHG emissions in the future.

    (Comparative life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions over ten year lifetime of an average mid-size car by powertrain, 2018, IEA, Paris, International Energy Agency Global EV Outlook 2020)

    However, there are still negatives associated with the production of EV batteries. As of now, most batteries for EVs (along with other electronic devices like your cell phone), are made from lithium, a naturally-occurring mineral found within the earth. To extract lithium, a lot of water is needed and unfortunately, the most lithium-rich spot in the world, South America’s Lithium Triangle also happens to be one of the driest. In parts of Chile, 65% of all of the region’s water is going to mining activities, and this has a harsh impact on local farmers. Locals are also often underrepresented in the mining process, as large companies come in and extract resources from their land with little or no pay. It is no doubt that these lithium batteries are essential in the electrification of vehicles, and thus the fight against global warming and pollution, but lithium cannot be considered a just solution if the industry continues to contribute to water depletion and global extractivism.

    EV Range Anxiety 

    Range anxiety, or the fear that your EV will run out of power because it has a shorter range on a full charge than a conventional vehicle on a full tank of gas, is one of the most common concerns for interested EV buyers. While it is true that EVs have a shorter range than conventional vehicles, there are a few things to note that can help mitigate consumer range anxiety. 

    The average American driver drives about 37 miles per day. Most EV drivers begin their daily commute with a full charge after charging overnight. With the shortest range on a full charge at about 57 miles for older EV vehicles and a modern range at about 200 miles, it is unlikely that an EV driver would be stranded without a charge on an average day. 
    Even in the last two model years, ranges of electric sedans, wagons, and SUVs have increased by an average of 5-10% over the previous year, based on data of 74 commercially-available all-electric vehicles from AFDC’s alternative fuel vehicle search. The chart below shows that the average range of an EV sedan or SUV is now above 240 miles with many sedans approaching 400 miles.

    Further, while EV infrastructure scarcity is a legitimate issue, EV charging stations are on the rise in many regions, in part thanks to increased incentives and funding sources like the VW Mitigation Trust. In the last few years, Louisiana has installed enough EV charging stations along I-10 to complete a short FHWA Alternative Fuel Corridor and designate the rest of I-10 and I-12 as pending corridors. However, many owners of newer EVs with ranges of 300+ miles find that they rarely need to charge in public. By adding EV charging stations at places of work, the charging needs of people with older EVs with shorter ranges would be satisfied. 

    Ultimately, most EV owners charge at home with Level 2 chargers. These chargers can cost as little as $1,000, and state tax credits and utility incentives can lower that cost. But if needed, tools like the Alternative Fuels Data Center Fueling Station Locator can also assist in finding EV charging stations in the United States and Canada.

    Louisiana Clean Fuels and Electric Vehicles

    As a Clean Cities coalition, Louisiana Clean Fuels (LCF) works with businesses, municipalities, and individuals looking to make the transition to alternative fuels vehicles, including electric vehicles. We provide technical assistance on matters including which vehicles to purchase, feasibility analysis, charging infrastructure placement and installation, and available funding. Our history of successful partnerships in Louisiana includes support for public and private fleets as well as serving as subject matter experts (SME) for our stakeholders, state legislators and policymakers. 

    In summary, electric vehicles are a viable cleaner option that is not only gaining in popularity but is constantly improving. States, local municipalities, businesses, and utilities who educate themselves and actively prepare for this near seismic shift in our transportation systems will be better positioned to capitalize on the benefits of electric vehicles while avoiding the pitfalls that result from lack of preparation. 

    How to Learn More About Electric Vehicles and Infrastructure Needs

    This fall, LCF is hosting several webinars designed to inform elected officials, utilities, regulators and fleets – large and small – on the various EV related topics from “EV Market Watch” where we delve into market trends and show the variety of currently available EV work trucks, to advanced topics like our webinar on Multi-port, 1+MW Charging System for Medium- and Heavy-Duty EVs. Visit our website and subscribe to our monthly newsletter to stay informed about alternative fuels projects and programs as well as ways to reduce your emissions through technology and proven fleet management practices.

    Resources:

    Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles

    Emissions Associated with Electric Vehicle Charging: Impact of Electricity Generation Mix, Charging Infrastructure Availability, and Vehicle Type

    Louisiana State Profile and Energy Estimates

    EV Sales Trends: COVID-19 Implications

    Read the original article on Fuels Fix


    Read More

    FOTW #1144: U.S. Energy Savings Due to Light-Duty Plug-In Electric Vehicle Use Estimated at 44.8 Trillion Btu in 2019

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    Due to their efficiency, plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) reduce the amount of energy used by light-duty vehicles compared to their internal combustion engine counterparts. Estimates show that the energy savings in the United States due to light-duty PEVs in 2019 was 44.8 trillion Btu, up 47% from 2018. The reduction of energy use by plug-in electric vehicles translates to a savings of 470 million gallons of gasoline in 2019.

    Notes: Gasoline conversion to Btu using gross heating value 125,000 Btu/gallon. Electricity conversion to Btu using 3,412 Btu/kWh.

    Source: Argonne National Laboratory, Assessment of Light-Duty Plug-In Electric Vehicles in the United States, 2010 – 2019, June 2020.

    Fact #1144 Dataset

    READ THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE


    Read More

    EV Sales Trends: Covid-19 Implications

    By Samantha Breaux and Jacob Holt, LCF Interns

    It is no question that the Covid-19 pandemic has had an impact on the world’s economy this year. Across the globe, countries are struggling to stimulate their economies and return to normalcy. What does this mean for electric vehicle (EV) sales in the coming years? A few reports, including one from Bloomberg New Energy Finance, have suggested that sales will fall throughout the 2020 year but ultimately return to new growth by 2021.

    COVID-19 Forecasted Impact on EV Sales

    Between April and May, as the Covid-19 pandemic swept across the country, research companies began looking into the short and long-term implications of the economic downturn on EV sales. Wood Mackenzie was one of the first to comment, predicting a 43% drop in sales by the end of 2020. A few weeks later, Bloomberg New Energy Finance posted three potential scenarios for EV sales, deciding that the most likely outcome is that 2020 global sales fall 18%. Both companies have suggested that sales will begin to grow in 2021, returning to the 2019 value by 2025. Long term trends suggest this will result in an unchanged trajectory compared to those developed pre-pandemic. Perhaps the most optimistic projection comes from the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) Global EV Outlook 2020, which estimates that EV sales of passenger and commercial light-duty vehicles will remain broadly at 2019 levels, based on sales data from January to April 2020.

    Explanations for Decrease in EV Sales

    Other experts have turned to platforms, such as Green Car Reports, to discuss possible causes for the expected decrease in sales. One common explanation is that the economic downturn has resulted in consumer uncertainty surrounding future income and economic stability. Car purchases represent a large financial investment that buyers are unwilling to take right now.

    Automakers will also be responsible for the forecasted decrease in sales as delays in highly anticipated EV releases are expected. Due to pandemic-related shutdowns and poor economic conditions, many companies have delayed the release of their electric vehicles. This includes the Ford Mustang Mach-E and GM’s electric vehicles. Along with this, the Trump administration announced its Safer Affordable Fuel Efficient (SAFE) rule in late March requiring a 1.5% annual improvement in fleet emissions from 2021 to 2026. This standard is relaxed from the previous 5% annual increase requirement, and it loosens industry incentives to meet emission standards through EV or hybrid vehicles. This federal policy that undercuts California’s authority to maintain more stringent emissions standards has been challenged in courts by a group of 23 states, beginning in September 2019. As these policy disputes are resolved, the impact of the resulting emissions policies will become more predictable.

    Opportunities for an Increase in EV Sales

    Though companies across the industry agree that EV sales will take a hit this year, there are notable opportunities for an increase in sales due to the global pandemic and resulting economic downturn. As Advanced Clean Tech (ACT) News points out, traditional truck makers have existing product lines that cannot support themselves when experiencing cash flow issues from closures and low demand. Electric truck startups, however, often ride on venture capital. They don’t have physical capital to support today, so they are less likely to be impacted by economic slowdown. Instead, companies can focus on research and intellectual property development while production is halted. Other company incentives to start or continue EV development include low interest rates when borrowing money. This gives fleets a lower-cost opportunity to take a chance and begin familiarizing themselves with electric vehicles.

    It is also important to note that several automakers have already expressed their desires to be carbon neutral. This is led by government incentives, such as those announced by France to support sales of lower-emission vehicles with coronavirus corporate bailout money, as well as a recent shift in investor attitudes. As companies begin seeing the positive economic impacts of carbon-neutrality, the shift towards electrification of vehicles will continue.

    What This Means for Louisiana

    Specifically in Louisiana, economists are discussing what could be an economic downturn worse than the one experienced after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In 2005, our state’s unemployment rate peaked at about 242,330 citizens, but this number was surpassed in April of this year for a peak unemployment of 291,286 people. Based on this, it is reasonable to predict that the decline in EV sales will be seen in Louisiana as well because consumer income stability has been impacted. By applying the global trend predicted by BloombergNEF and Wood Mackenzie, Louisiana Clean Fuels has forecasted that the projected EV ownership by 2040 in Louisiana will fall from 1.6 million to 1.55 million EVs. This number still represents nearly half of all vehicle registrations in Louisiana by 2040, in line with current overall US projections. This means a relatively low-impact for the long-term electrification of transportation, but short-term sales may be more seriously burdened.

    Figure 1: Long term EV ownership projections in Louisiana show a period of exponential growth that begins near 2030, despite potential drops in EV sales this year due to COVID-19. Long term estimates are impacted by many factors that are relatively unpredictable, but most models show this trend in long term growth globally.

    By 2024 and using the BNEF estimates, total EV ownership in Louisiana could be as low as 5,000 EV, or half of what pre-COVID projections show; however, this number is still twice as many EVs as the 2,400 registered in Louisiana in 2019, and BNEF projections estimate that the exponentially increasing trend in EV sales will continue by 2025 as battery costs decrease and range and consumer confidence increase. Light-duty commercial or government fleets in Louisiana are best poised to avoid these short term impacts by seeking incentives to offset the cost of EV charging equipment. If the best case scenario projected by the IEA is achieved instead, there will be no significant decrease in EV sales, and short term impacts to Louisiana would be minimal.

    Figure 2: This middle case for short term EV ownership projections represents the BNEF estimate that EV sales will drop 18% in 2020 and recover to 2019 levels by 2025. While 2024 levels in Louisiana are about half of what we expected before COVID-19, this still represents a doubling of EV in the state, and the exponential growth of sales will likely resume by 2025.

    Learn More

    To learn more about post-pandemic projections, please visit the following sites:

    https://www.woodmac.com/press-releases/global-electric-vehicle-sales-to-drop-43-in-2020/

    https://about.bnef.com/blog/electric-vehicle-sales-to-fall-18-in-2020-but-long-term-prospects-remain-undimmed/

    https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1127796_will-oil-prices-and-post-pandemic-hesitation-hit-ev-sales-harder-than-general-market

    https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1127654_trump-epa-lowers-gas-mileage-targets-increases-vehicle-emissions

    https://www.act-news.com/news/electric-trucks-present-a-covid-19-opportunity/

    https://www.iea.org/reports/global-ev-outlook-2020

     


    Read More

    LCF Staff Pick: Top 5 tools on the AFDC

    By Samantha Breax, LCF Intern

    Whether you’re working at home, looking for data from the office, or interested in starting your alternative fuel journey, the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) provides free access to all of the tools you need. As an unbiased resource from the US Department of Energy, AFDC offers calculators, interactive maps, and data searches to assist fleets, fuel providers, and the everyday driver in advancing alternative fuel and energy-efficient efforts.

    To access their entire collection of tools, visit https://afdc.energy.gov/tools.

    Here are five of our favorite AFDC tools:

    1) Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Projection Tool (EVI-Pro) Lite

    This calculator provides an estimate of how many public electric vehicle chargers would be necessary in a given state/urban area to support EV adoption. Along with its recommendation, it provides the number of currently available chargers and next-steps for new stations.

    View the EVI-Pro Lite Tool

    2) Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    The Alternative Fueling Station map shows public fueling stations across the United States and Canada. It includes mapping for all alternative fuels, including electric, CNG, LNG, propane, biodiesel, hydrogen, and ethanol. For private fleets, private fueling stations can also be located, along with unavailable and planned stations, by using the advanced filters option. The route mapping feature allows you to plan travel with fueling stops in mind.

    View the Station Locator

    3) Vehicle Cost Calculator

    This tool allows you to compare the cost of ownership, annual fuel and electricity use, and expected emissions between up to 8 vehicles simultaneously. Basic information about your driving habits is used to calculate costs and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles manufactured since 2005.

    View the vehicle cost calculator

    4) AFLEET tool 

    The AFLEET tool uses data from Argonne National Labs’ GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) to calculate a fleet’s petroleum use, greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions, and cost of ownership. The spreadsheet uses simple inputs such as vehicle type, year, and mileage to calculate emissions per year and per vehicle lifetime. The most recent version allows for analysis of off-road equipment as well as light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles. This tool is for those who are comfortable with and are well versed in Excel. If you would like assistance with this tool, please email us at [email protected].

    View the AFLEET tool


    5) State Information

    The State Information data search pulls information for your state about laws and incentives, fueling stations, Clean Cities Coalitions, fuel prices, vehicle emissions, and more. It contains links to other tools provided by AFDC, such as the Clean Cities Coalitions Locator and Laws and Incentives Search, acting as a one-stop shop for all state-wide information. 

    View state information

    learn more on the AFDC website


    Read More

    Notice of Intent to Issue a Vehicle Technologies Funding Opportunity

    Originally posted by the DOE EERE

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office has published a notice of intent to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) titled "Fiscal Year 2020 Advanced Vehicle Technologies Research FOA." The FOA will support a broad portfolio of advanced vehicle technologies that can strengthen national security, enable future economic growth, support American energy dominance, and increase transportation affordability for all Americans. This FOA may include the following topics:

    • Lithium-Ion Batteries using Silicon-Based Anode
    • Low Cost Electric Traction Drive Systems Using No Heavy Rare Earth Materials
    • Utility Managed Smart Charging
    • Platinum Group Metals Content Reduction to Enable Cost-Effective Aftertreatment for Gasoline and Diesel Engines
    • Improved Efficiency of Medium- and Heavy-Duty Natural Gas and Propane (LPG) Engines
    • Energy-Efficient Off-Road Technologies Directly Applicable to Agriculture Sector and/or Other Off-Road Vehicles
    • Lightweight and High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites for Vehicle Applications
    • Energy Efficient Mobility Systems
    • Technology Integration
    • Transportation and Energy Analysis


    The Vehicle Technologies’ portfolio includes advanced batteries, electric drive systems; smart charging technologies; energy efficient mobility technologies and systems; advanced combustion engines and fuels; materials for vehicle light-weighting; technology integration, which includes work with the national network of Clean Cities coalitions; and transportation and energy analysis.

    View the Notice of Intent


    Read More