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    FOTW #1112: The U.S. Transportation Sector Consumed 1.4 Quadrillion Btu of Fuel Made from Biomass in 2018

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    Of the 28.4 quadrillion Btu (quads) of energy consumed by the U.S. transportation sector in 2018, 1.4 quads were produced from biomass. Fuel ethanol made up 81.4% of biomass-based transportation fuels in 2018, followed by biodiesel (17.1%) and other (1.5%).

    Note: The "other" category includes fuel blending components produced from renewable sources that meet the requirements of advanced biofuels.

    Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review, September 2019, Tables 10.2b and 2.5.

    Fact #1112 Dataset

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    FOTW #1110: Average Annual Gasoline Taxes Paid per Vehicle, by State, 2019

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    According to the Federal Highway Administration, the average fuel economy for all light vehicles on the road today is 22.3 miles per gallon (mpg) and the average annual miles driven is 11,484 miles. The Federal tax on gasoline is 18.4 cents per gallon, and each state has a gasoline tax, ranging from 8.95 cents in Alaska to 58.7 cents in Pennsylvania. Since taxes are charged on a per-gallon basis, someone with a more efficient vehicle will pay less in taxes over the course of a year. Based on average mpg and miles driven, a person owning a gasoline vehicle pays between $141 and $398 in fuel taxes each year, depending upon the state in which the fuel is purchased.

    Note: Based on a vehicle with an average fuel economy of 22.3 mpg driven 11,484 miles in 2019. Taxes include federal and state gasoline tax, along with other per-gallon fees, such as leaking underground storage tank fees.

    Source: Calculated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory using average annual miles and average fuel economy of the light-duty vehicle population from the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, Highway Statistics 2017, Table VM-1; and tax data by state from the U.S. Energy Information Administration website, August 2019.

    Fact #1110 Dataset

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    FOTW #1109: All-Electric Vehicles Have the Lowest Estimated Annual Fuel Cost of All Light-Duty Vehicles

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    The estimated annual fuel costs for model year (MY) 2019 all-electric light-duty vehicles are the lowest of all the different vehicle technologies, ranging from a low of $500 to a high of $900 per year. The annual fuel costs for plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles, which can fuel with gasoline and electricity, are next lowest, and are heavily influenced by the electric range of the vehicle. Hybrid-electric vehicles, which are fueled only with gasoline, generally use their technology for maximizing fuel economy; however, because some models use their hybrid systems to boost performance rather than to increase fuel economy, not all hybrid vehicles have low fuel costs. Conventional gasoline vehicles for MY 2019 have estimated annual fuel costs ranging from $1,000 to $4,100—the widest range, with the most vehicle models available.

    Notes: All annual vehicle fuel costs are rounded to the nearest $50. Annual fuel cost estimates are based on combined city/highway fuel economy, 15,000 annual miles, and the following fuel prices: $2.55 regular gasoline; $3.00 premium gasoline; $2.85 diesel; and $0.13 electricity per kilowatt-hour.

    Source: U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Fuel Economy Data, accessed October 1, 2019.

    Fact #1109 Dataset

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    FOTW #1106: In the Last Two Months of 2018, U.S. Monthly Sales of All-Electric Vehicles Outpaced Both Plug-in Hybrids and Conventional Hybrids

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    All-electric vehicle (EV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) sales in the United States have generally increased since their introduction in 2010, and the sales of both vehicle types remained fairly close until 2018. Since May 2018, EV sales have exceeded the sales of PHEVs every month, sometimes by wide margins. In December 2018, EV sales reached 36,961—about three times higher than PHEV sales for that month, and more than 7,000 higher than conventional hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), which have been on the market for about two decades.

    Source: Argonne National Laboratory, Light-Duty Electric Drive Vehicles Monthly Sales Update Program, August 2019.

    Fact #1106 Dataset

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    FOTW #1104: Eighty-Four Million Shared Bike and Scooter Trips in U.S. in 2018

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    In recent years, the deployment of micromobility sharing services (bikes and scooters) has expanded rapidly in cities across the United States. According to the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), the number of shared bike trips in the 100 largest U.S. cities increased from 321,000 in 2010 to 45.5 million in 2018. Shared scooter trips were added to the NACTO study in 2018. There were 38.5 million shared scooter trips in 2018, representing 46% of the 84 million shared micromobility trips taken last year.

    Note: Shared micromobility refers to small fleets of fully or partially human-powered vehicles including bikes, e-bikes, and e-scooters. Data includes systems with over 150 bikes or scooters and only includes data reported by the 100 largest cities by population. Data does not include private or closed campus systems like those operating on university campuses. For more detail, see the full report here.

    Source: National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), Shared Micromobility in the U.S.: 2018, April 2019.

    Fact #1104 Dataset

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