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    FOTW# 1167: Median Driving Range of All-Electric Vehicles Tops 250 Miles for Model Year 2020

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    Since 2011, significant improvements in battery technologies and overall EV efficiency have led to an expanding number of EV models and increased driving ranges. The median EPA estimated range for all EV models offered in the 2020 model year exceeded 250 miles. The 2020 model year also marked the first year that an EV achieved an EPA estimated maximum range of more than 400 miles.

    Source: U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Fuel Economy website. Data accessed October 30, 2020.

    Fact #1167 Dataset

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    FOTW# 1166: Model Year 2020 Light-Duty Vehicles Offered Consumers a Wide Range of Fuel Economy Choices

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) publishes a minimum and maximum combined city/highway fuel economy for each vehicle size class. Their data shows that, in most cases, there is a wide range of fuel economies for consumers to consider when purchasing a new vehicle. For model year 2020, the midsize car class had the widest range in fuel economy, spanning from 12 to 141 MPG/MPGe*. The vehicle classes that have maximum fuel economy ratings topping one hundred MPG reflect the inclusion of all-electric models. These models have much higher efficiency than conventional vehicles. The median fuel economy of all vehicle classes falls into a much narrower band ranging from 19 to 28 MPG/MPGe*.

    * Plug-in electric vehicles are measured in miles per gallon equivalent or MPGe where 1 gallon of gasoline is equal to the energy in 33.7 kW-hrs of electricity.

    Note: Includes light-duty vehicles of all fuel types. For plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, a composite gasoline-electric MPGe was used.

    Source: U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Fuel Economy website. Data accessed October 30, 2020.

    Fact #1166 Dataset

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    FOTW# 1161: A Tool is Available for Estimating Charging Loads from Plug-In Electric Vehicles

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has recently upgraded their Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Projection (EVI-Pro) Lite tool to inform industry stakeholders about the electricity needed to charge plug-in vehicles. Within the tool, users can customize to their own specifications for:

    • Location (city and state)
    • Number of plug-in vehicles
    • Average daily miles per vehicle
    • Average ambient temperature
    • All-electric vehicle share
    • Vehicle type
    • Share of workplace/home charging
    • Charging levels
    • Charging time of day.

    Real-world travel data from consumers are used to model future requirements for residential, workplace, and public charging under different scenarios. The model results for the electric load profile for a fleet of 1,000 plug-in vehicles in Indianapolis, IN, are shown below as an example. EVI-Pro Lite is also useful for estimating the number of electric vehicle chargers needed in an area to sustain a certain number of plug-in vehicles.

    Example of EVI-Pro Lite Results

    Note: EVI-Pro Lite has been developed through a collaboration between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Energy Commission, with additional support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office. Load profile analysis capabilities in EVI-Pro Lite have been developed through a collaborative effort between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Schatz Energy Research Center at Humboldt State University.

    Source: Alternative Fuels Data Center, Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Projection (EVI-Pro) Lite.

    Fact #1161 Dataset

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    FOTW# 1159: Shared Micromobility Trips Grew by 62% in 2019

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    The number of micromobility trips grew 62% from 2018 to 2019 due to the large increase in scooter trips. Shared micromobility refers to small fleets of fully or partially human-powered vehicles including bikes, e-bikes, and e-scooters. Trips on scooters more than doubled from 2018 to 2019 while bike trips increased by 3% and e-bike trips increased 54%. Data collection by the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) began in 2010 and included only bike trips until 2018.

    Note: Data includes systems with over 150 bikes or scooters and includes only data reported by large cities. Data does not include private or closed campus systems like those operating on university campuses. For more detail, see the source report.

    Source: National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), Shared Micromobility in the U.S.: 2019, Summer 2020.

    Fact #1159 Dataset

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