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    Louisiana Clean Fuels Seeks Nominations for the Katry Martin Award

    Awards Ceremony to be held November 5, 2020, at the LCF 20th Anniversary Gala and Annual Clean Fuel Leader Awards

    Every two years, LCF honors one person whose kindness, positive attitude, and passion for alternative fuels sets them apart from their peers. The award's namesake, Katry Martin, served as the Executive Director of St. Landry Parish Solid Waste. Under his leadership, St Landry Parish was the first landfill in Louisiana to successfully commission, operate and monetize Environmental Attributes. While many others talked about the merits of carbon offsets, St. Landry Parish planned and executed. Additionally, St. Landry Parish was one of the first to build, own and operate a Renewable Natural Gas (CNG) Project at the landfill. This project is the template for smaller RNG (CNG) Projects on a global basis. Katry was revered for being a visionary who was also able to take his ideas and put them into practice.

    LCF awarded Katry and St. Landry with the Innovative Project award at our 15th Anniversary Celebration in 2015, something that he was extremely proud of. Anyone who met him knew him to be a kind, humble, and passionate man who was responsible for dreaming up and making St. Landry's groundbreaking RNG facility a reality. Katry passed away on October 10, 2017, after a brief battle with cancer. The Katry Martin Award serves as a chance for LCF to honor his legacy and recognize his contributions to alternative fuels.

    Winner of the First-Ever Katry Martin Award in 2018:  Faltery "F.J." Jolivette

    Anyone who has ever met F.J. will understand why he was selected to honor his former boss as the first-ever winner of the Katry Martin Award. His kindness, humility, and passion for his job set him apart from his peers and endear him to everyone he meets. As the operator of St. Landry Parish Solid Waste's landfill gas to renewable natural gas facility, F.J. has been an integral part of the renewable natural gas industry for many years. His incredible work at St. Landry has been recognized across the nation and internationally – he once gave a presentation in Africa on the use of landfill gas as a vehicle fuel! His industry leadership has kept St. Landry's project thriving since 2012, and he truly exemplifies the qualities that were so well-loved in Katry Martin.

     

    LCF is asking for nominations of one individual in Louisiana whose character and contribution to Clean Cities, alternative fuels, petroleum and/or emissions reduction honors the legacy and spirit of Katry Martin.

    Nominations for the 2020 Katry Martin Award are due Friday, September 4, 2020.

    submit a nomination

    Note: Louisiana Clean Fuels staff are not eligible for this award.


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    LCF Staff Pick: Top 5 tools on the AFDC

    By Samantha Breax, LCF Intern

    Whether you’re working at home, looking for data from the office, or interested in starting your alternative fuel journey, the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) provides free access to all of the tools you need. As an unbiased resource from the US Department of Energy, AFDC offers calculators, interactive maps, and data searches to assist fleets, fuel providers, and the everyday driver in advancing alternative fuel and energy-efficient efforts.

    To access their entire collection of tools, visit https://afdc.energy.gov/tools.

    Here are five of our favorite AFDC tools:

    1) Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Projection Tool (EVI-Pro) Lite

    This calculator provides an estimate of how many public electric vehicle chargers would be necessary in a given state/urban area to support EV adoption. Along with its recommendation, it provides the number of currently available chargers and next-steps for new stations.

    View the EVI-Pro Lite Tool

    2) Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    The Alternative Fueling Station map shows public fueling stations across the United States and Canada. It includes mapping for all alternative fuels, including electric, CNG, LNG, propane, biodiesel, hydrogen, and ethanol. For private fleets, private fueling stations can also be located, along with unavailable and planned stations, by using the advanced filters option. The route mapping feature allows you to plan travel with fueling stops in mind.

    View the Station Locator

    3) Vehicle Cost Calculator

    This tool allows you to compare the cost of ownership, annual fuel and electricity use, and expected emissions between up to 8 vehicles simultaneously. Basic information about your driving habits is used to calculate costs and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles manufactured since 2005.

    View the vehicle cost calculator

    4) AFLEET tool 

    The AFLEET tool uses data from Argonne National Labs’ GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) to calculate a fleet’s petroleum use, greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions, and cost of ownership. The spreadsheet uses simple inputs such as vehicle type, year, and mileage to calculate emissions per year and per vehicle lifetime. The most recent version allows for analysis of off-road equipment as well as light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles. This tool is for those who are comfortable with and are well versed in Excel. If you would like assistance with this tool, please email us at [email protected].

    View the AFLEET tool


    5) State Information

    The State Information data search pulls information for your state about laws and incentives, fueling stations, Clean Cities Coalitions, fuel prices, vehicle emissions, and more. It contains links to other tools provided by AFDC, such as the Clean Cities Coalitions Locator and Laws and Incentives Search, acting as a one-stop shop for all state-wide information. 

    View state information

    learn more on the AFDC website


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    Baton Rouge Bikeshare Program Seeing Success Despite COVID-19

    By Olivia Montgomery, LCF Intern

    Across the country, cities are rethinking the way they invest in transportation infrastructure. Baton Rouge in particular has joined a growing list of cities investing in bikeshare programs, one piece of a larger trend of services known as shared micromobility, which generally refers to share programs offering bikes, scooters, or e-bikes. Gotcha bikes, offered in the Baton Rouge area, are e-bikes that allow the rider to pedal or coast with the electric motor.

    From a sustainability perspective, these programs offer a great way to reduce automobile use by providing a quick and easy means of transportation for those rides that are too short for a drive and too long for a conventional bike. More broadly, bikeshare programs also offer economic benefits in that they can encourage economic development in certain areas, expand the reach of current public transit options, and improve public health.

    How to Ride

    As of July 2019, Gotcha bikes are available to rent on a pay-per-minute basis in Baton Rouge. Riders can download the Gotcha app to sign up, find docking station locations, and scan the bike to pay and ride. Once finished, riders can deposit the bike at any other station in the city. There are 17 locations downtown, in addition to stations near LSU, Southern University, and the Perkins Road overpass. The cost to rent is currently a $2 fee, plus $.10 per minute, or riders can purchase yearly or monthly subscriptions.

    Current Success

    According to the National Association of City Transportation Officials, the number of shared micromobility rides doubled from 2017 to 2018. Today, COVID-19 seems to be aiding the trend of growth. Nationwide, cities have closed streets or limited their capacity to create more space for socially distanced foot and bike traffic and to reduce reliance upon crowded public transit, naturally creating more demand for bikeshare rides.

    Though Baton Rouge has not made major changes to traffic flow, the impact of COVID-19 on bikeshare rides is similar in the capital area. On May 4, 2020, the Baton Rouge Area Foundation’s newsletter reported “Ridership is up 213% overall even though LSU students are no longer on campus. Trips per day had grown to nearly 600 on April 26, when the bikeshare company reported its latest activity. Weekly active riders soared to 1,500 in late April from less than 100 before COVID-19.”

    Some see this moment as an opportunity for changes that last beyond the pandemic. Former New York City transit commissioner Jannette Sadik-Kahn recently stated that this is a “once-in-a-lifetime chance to change course and repair the damage from a century of car-focused streets.” Coincidentally, one challenge Baton Rouge faces in growing its bikeshare program is the lack of comfortable bike paths and trails throughout the city. In fact, there are few, if any, comfortable trails connecting the clusters of docking stations throughout the city (i.e. LSU or Southern to downtown). Further, the City’s Bike Share Business and Implementation Plan includes expanding docking locations into different areas in a series of phases. However, one must ask how beneficial bikeshare access will be in areas with no sidewalks or bike lanes.

    Considering the increased demand for bikeshare rides, further strengthened by the COVID-19 pandemic, now is the time for Baton Rouge streets to become more bike-friendly. Over time, as shared micromobility increases, the positive impact on the city’s carbon emissions, car-congested streets, and more will become apparent.

    For more information, check out the following resources:

    Baton Rouge Ride Gotcha

    Baton Rouge's bike-sharing program sees dramatic uptick in ridership amid coronavirus pandemic

    COVID-19 Reveals How Micromobility Can Build Resilient Cities

    Webinars on COVID-19 and Micromobility

    Biking Provides a Critical Lifeline During the Coronavirus Crisis 


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    FOTW #1138: New Light-Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy in the United States Has Nearly Doubled Since 1975

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    From 1975 to 2019, fuel economy for all new light-duty vehicles produced for sale in the United States has increased from an average of 13.1 miles per gallon (mpg) to 25.5 mpg, a 95% increase. This is a significant improvement considering the new vehicle mix has recently shifted heavily towards SUVs and pickups, which generally have lower fuel economy than cars. The car SUV category showed the most improvement from 1975 to 2019 with a 143% increase in fuel economy. Cars, truck SUVs and vans each increased by more than 100% in that same time frame, while pickups increased by 63%.

    Note: Data for 2019 are preliminary. Data are production weighted. The “Car SUV” category includes 2-wheel drive SUV with inertia weight of 4,000 lb. or less.

    Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2019 EPA Automotive Trends Report, EPA-420-R-20-006, March 2020.

    Fact #1138 Dataset

    READ the original article


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    Wheels Keep Turning on Innovations for More Efficient and Clean Vehicles

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    While approximately 30% of today’s new cars can boast fuel economy of at least 30 miles per gallon, there is still the opportunity for further efficiency gains. In addition, while trucks make up just 4% of all U.S. automobiles, they account for more than 25% of transportation-related fuel consumption, and diesel averages 44 cents more per gallon than gasoline.

    Top scientists, engineers, and analysts with the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Co-Optimization of Fuels & Engines (Co-Optima) initiative are examining how simultaneous improvements to fuels and engines can improve efficiency and reduce emissions and costs of the entire on-road fleet, including light-duty (LD), medium-duty (MD), and heavy-duty (HD) internal combustion vehicles that are likely to make up the majority of the U.S. automotive market for decades to come.

    After completing a major body of research focused on turbocharged spark ignition engines in Fiscal Year (FY) 2018, Co-Optima’s FY2019 LD research and development (R&D) shifted focus to multimode solutions that employ multiple engine operating modes to maximize engine efficiency and fuel economy. A new report highlights the most significant Co-Optima R&D accomplishments from FY 2019, with details on findings that straddle LD, MD, and HD technologies.

    Co-Optima is jointly sponsored by DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies and Vehicle Technologies offices. Partners include nine National Laboratories, along with more than 20 university and industry partners.

    Get more details on the report and learn more about the Co-Optima initiative.

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    SWEPCO's Level 2 Home EV Charging Station Rebate Program

    Electric vehicle owners in Southwestern Electric Power Company's (SWEPCO) territory could receive payment for installing a Level 2 electric vehicle charger in their homes. SWEPCO is now offering a new $250 rebate for their residential customers "who own or rent a single-family home" and "install an ENERGY STAR-certified Level 2 EV Charging Station." Currently, the rebate is available for SWEPCO customers in Louisiana and Texas, and SWEPCO is hoping to offer the rebate to Arkansas customers in the future.

    To qualify for the rebate, customers must install the ENERGY STAR-certified Level 2 charging station and save their receipt for proof of purchase. According to SWEPCO, qualifying ENERGY STAR-certified Level 2 EV Charging Stations can be purchased "online, from a local retailer or a dealership." You can learn more about ENERGY STAR-certified chargers on the ENERGY STAR website.

    Important to note are the rules of the rebate program, which can be found on SWEPCO's website. These rules specify that the rebate is limited to two Level 2 EV Charging Station per home and that funding is limited and will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. The rebate also only applies to charging stations installed in 2020, and application information "must be submitted within 30 days of equipment installation and set up."

    SWEPCO customers who wish to learn more about the rebate program can find more information on SWEPCO's Rebate Program page. Customers wishing to claim the rebate should fill out SWEPCO's online application.

    LEARN MORE


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    FOTW #1135: Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards Finalized Through 2026

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    On March 31, 2020, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration posted the final Safer Affordable Fuel-Efficient Vehicles Rule, which finalizes the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards through 2026. Estimates of CAFE requirements for cars reach 47.7 miles per gallon (mpg) in 2026 and for light trucks reach 34.1 mpg.

    Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, The Safer Affordable Fuel-Efficient 'SAFE' Vehicles Rule, Final Rule, Tables II-15 and II-16.

    Fact #1135 Dataset

    read the original article


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    2020 Enrollment for LCF’s Green Fleets Program is now open!

    Louisiana Clean Fuels (LCF) has opened the 2020 enrollment period for our Green Fleets Certification program! The LCF Green Fleets Program is designed to recognize fleets for their progress towards their emission reduction goals as well as to assist fleets in deploying solutions that improve the economic and environmental performance of vehicle operations.

    What is Green Fleets Certification?

    Through Green Fleets, Louisiana Clean Fuels conducts emissions analysis and quantification of on-road vehicles for fleets throughout the state of Louisiana. Fleets can also promote their Certified Green Fleets status, showing their commitment to reducing emissions. Once certified, your organization will receive a report detailing your emissions reductions and scoring under the program along with permission to use the Green Fleets certification seal for your certification level on any and all of your organization’s publications for one year.

    Benefits of being an LCF Certified Green Fleet

    • Educational opportunities with workshops, training, and more.
    • Recognition and certification for environmental fleet leaders.
    • Branding and promotional tools for fleet achievement.
    • Informational resources on technology options and available incentives.
    • Connections with vendors offering advanced fuel and vehicle technologies, equipment, conversion systems, and more.
    • Funding assistance with grant opportunities; better data makes a better application. 

    Past Participants

    Examples of past participants include Republic Services, SporTran, the City of Lake Charles, Corporate Green, and UPS. all of which achieved certification through the Louisiana Clean Fuels Green Fleets Program. It takes significant effort to achieve any certification level, and Louisiana Clean Fuels is proud to offer recognition to fleets dedicated to reducing emissions. 

    The City of Lake Charles

    The City of Lake Charles achieved a 1-star certification through the Greet Fleets Program for the Lake Charles Public Works Transit Division in 2019. Lake Charles operates propane para-transit buses in their fleet.

    Republic Services

    Across the country, refuse companies are great examples of successful natural gas programs. Republic Services - also recognized as LCF’s 2019 Clean Fuel Champion at the Clean Fuel Leader Awards - achieved a 5-star certification through the 2019 Green Fleets Program. Republic Services utilizes compressed natural gas (CNG) in LCF’s territory to fuel their refuse trucks. Additionally, Republic Services reduces their emissions and fuel usage through other methods, including idle reduction, vehicle miles traveled (VMT) reduction, and fuel economy improvements.

    SporTran

    Shreveport’s transit company, SporTran, achieved a 5-star certification through the Green Fleets Program in 2019. SporTran’s bus fleet runs on 100% alternative fuels and consists of 33 CNG-powered buses and 5 electric buses.

    How to Enroll

    Enrolling in our Green Fleets program is simple and free.

    1. Fill out this short form or email LCF’s Co-Coordinator Tyler Herrmann at [email protected] to express your interest in the program.
    2. We will work with you to collect your relevant fleet data, such as vehicle types, model years, number of vehicles, fuel used, and fuel types.
    3. LCF will provide your fleet with a report that you can use as a benchmark for future fuel consumption and emission reduction programs. We will work with you to track your progress over time and provide guidance to help your fleet achieve emissions-reduction goals.

    With just a few extra steps, fleets who participated in our 2019 Annual Report can enroll in Green Fleets. The Annual Report survey asks users to indicate whether or not they’d like the data they’ve provided in the survey to be used to enroll them in the Green Fleets program. Most of the information needed for Green Fleets enrollment is already being provided for the Annual Report, so we can use that information to start the enrollment for the Green Fleets program if a fleet is interested. Then we will contact that fleet for further informational requirements at a later date.

    Learn more about the LCF Green Fleets Program and enrollment requirements on our Green Fleets Certification Program page.


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    FOTW #1131: Average Fuel Economy for Model Year 2019 Light-Duty Vehicles Was 95% Better than Model Year 1975

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    The average production-weighted fuel economy for all new light-duty vehicles in model year (MY) 2019 was 95% better than in MY 1975, while average horsepower was 78% higher and weight was 1% higher. From the late 1980s to the mid-2000s, fuel economy generally declined while horsepower and weight increased. Since 2004, due to technical innovations, fuel economy and horsepower have increased while vehicle weight has stayed about the same.

    Note: Data for 2019 are preliminary. All data are production weighted.

    Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2019 EPA Automotive Trends Report, EPA-420-R-20-006, March 2020

    Fact #1131 Dataset

    read the original article


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    FOTW #1128: Innovations in Automotive Battery Cell Composition

    Originally posted by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy | Original Article

    In 2019, most plug-in electric vehicles were powered by lithium-ion batteries. The cells in a lithium-ion battery are more complex than the lead-acid cells of a conventional vehicle’s battery, and they are composed of different materials. The exact chemistry of automotive lithium-ion batteries can vary by manufacturer. The Department of Energy has recently launched the ReCell Advanced Battery Recycling Center to further research on recycling technologies for current lithium-ion batteries and future battery chemistries.


    Source:
     Presentation by Argonne National Laboratory researcher Linda Gaines at the 2020 Transportation Research Board 99th Annual Meeting, January 12–16, 2020.

    Fact #1128 Dataset


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